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Food Budget the Average Family Spent on Restaurant Meals in Different Years - Task 1 Multiple Graphs

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The charts below show the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals in different years. The graph shows the number of meals eaten in fast food restaurants and sit-down restaurants.


Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information in the graph below.


Write at least 150 words.

Food Budget the Average Family Spent on Restaurant Meals in Different Years - Task 1 Multiple Graphs
Number Of Meals Eaten In Fast Food Restaurants And Sit-Down Restaurants

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Model Answer 1

The provided visuals delineate the escalating inclination of families towards dining at restaurants over a 30-year span from 1970 to 2000, as well as the corresponding swell in the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals within this period.


In a broad sense, there was a marked rise in both the frequency of meals consumed outside the home and the proportion of the food budget allocated to restaurant dining. Initially, the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals was a mere fraction of their overall food expenditure, but by the turn of the millennium, this had grown to encompass a substantial share.


Delving into specifics, the year 1970 saw families dedicating a modest 10% of their food budget to restaurant meals, while the average count of such meals stood at about 40 annually, evenly split between fast food and sit-down establishments. The ensuing decade witnessed a slight upturn, with 15% of the food budget going towards eating out, and the number of meals at fast food joints increasing to 35, out of approximately 60 total restaurant meals.


This trend continued to surge, and by 1990, the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals had more than doubled to 35%, with a pronounced preference for fast food as evidenced by 70 of the total 80 restaurant meals. The new millennium marked a peak, with families allocating a striking 50% of their food budget to restaurant meals, indulging in nearly 90 fast food meals and about 50 sit-down restaurant meals annually.


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Model Answer 2

The provided data elucidates the evolving trends in the allocation of the food budget by the average family towards restaurant meals over the course of thirty years, alongside a comparative account of the prevalence of meals consumed at fast food versus sit-down restaurants.


It is strikingly apparent from the overview that there has been a robust augmentation in the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals, escalating from a mere tenth in 1970 to an equitable split with home cooking by the year 2000. This overview also encapsulates the substantial shift towards fast food consumption, which, by the end of the millennium, had overshadowed sit-down restaurant meals by a significant margin.


Delving deeper, the pie charts chronicle a gradual yet steady incline in the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals, climbing to 15% by 1980 and further ballooning to 35% in 1990. This trajectory culminates in the year 2000, where the statistic reveals a landmark shift with half of the food budget being expended on restaurant dining. Concurrently, the line graph presents an initial parity in 1970, with both restaurant dining styles being patronized equally, at about 20 meals per annum.


However, the subsequent years narrate a tale of diverging paths. By 1980, sit-down restaurant meals witnessed a modest increase, whereas the consumption of fast food meals began to surge, a trend that continued unabated. By the turn of the century, the frequency of fast food meals had catapulted to just over 90 times per year, dwarfing the sit-down meal count, which lagged behind at 50.


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Model Answer 3

The provided  illustrations delineate the evolving patterns in the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals over the course of three decades, alongside a comparative analysis of the number of meals consumed in fast food versus sit-down restaurants.


An overarching trend is discernible from the data presented: there is a marked rise in the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals from 1970 to 2000, as well as a shifting preference towards fast food dining. In 1970, a mere 10% of the food budget was allocated to restaurant meals, which burgeoned to a substantial 50% by the year 2000.


Delving into the specifics, the initial period from 1970 witnessed an equivalence in the number of meals at both fast food and sit-down restaurants, each accounting for approximately 20 meals per year. Over time, fast food restaurants saw a gradual climb in patronage until 1980, thereafter experiencing a more pronounced growth, culminating in just under 90 meals per year by 2000. This was nearly twice the figure for sit-down restaurants in the same year. Contrastingly, sit-down restaurants enjoyed a sharper increase between 1970 and 1980 but observed a deceleration in growth post-1980.


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Model Answer 4

The visual data presented delineates the trend in the percentage of food budget the average family allocated to restaurant meals over a thirty-year period, alongside a comparison of the frequency of meals consumed at fast food versus sit-down restaurants during the same timeframe.


A sweeping overview of the data reveals a marked shift towards dining out. Initially, in 1970, a modest fraction of the family food budget—merely 10%—was directed towards meals outside the home. Concurrently, the number of meals enjoyed at fast food establishments and their sit-down counterparts was identical, both charting at twenty per annum.


Delving into specifics, the ensuing decade saw a discernible uptick in the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals, climbing to 15%, while the number of fast food meals began to lag slightly behind that of sit-down restaurants. This trend, however, took a dramatic turn in the following years. By 1990, not only had the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals more than doubled to 35%, but fast food consumption surged, dwarfing the figures for traditional dining with approximately 55 meals per year.


The turn of the millennium underscored this evolution in eating habits, as the percentage of food budget the average family spent on restaurant meals reached parity with home cooking, both commanding a 50% share. Fast food meals, by this point, had soared to an unprecedented 90 meals annually per person, solidifying the dominance of convenience-driven dining choices. In stark contrast, sit-down restaurants witnessed a more modest ascent, plateauing at around 50 meals per year.



Model Answer 5

The provided illustrations delineate the shift in dining preferences of the average family over a span of three decades, particularly focusing on the percentage of the food budget spent on restaurant meals and the frequency of meals consumed at fast food versus sit-down restaurants.


A sweeping trend observed from these visual data is the dramatic elevation in dependency on restaurant-prepared meals, which surged from a modest 10% of the food budget in 1970 to an astounding 50% by the year 2000. Concurrently, there was a discernible divergence in the patterns of eating out, with fast food meals gaining unprecedented momentum compared to their sit-down counterparts.


Analyzing the line chart in more detail, we note that in 1970, the inception point for both dining modes was identical, at around 20 meals per year. By 1980, sit-down restaurant meals witnessed a moderate rise to just over 30 meals annually, whereas fast food meals saw a lesser uptick. The following two decades marked a striking contrast, with fast food meals ascending steeply to touch nearly 90 meals per year by 2000, overshadowing the growth of sit-down meals which culminated at approximately 50 meals per annum.


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