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Quantities of Good Transported in the UK between 1974 and 2002 - Task 1 Line Graph

Updated: Jun 28

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graph below shows the quantities of good transported in the UK between 1974 and 2002 by four different modes of transport.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words


Task 1 Line Graph Band 9 Sample Report prompt (The graph below shows the quantities of good transported in the UK between 1974 and 2002 by four different modes of transport.)

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Model Answer 1

The line graph delineates the quantities of goods transported in the UK over a span from 1974 to 2002, segmented by road, water, rail, and pipeline conveyance. It is evident that over these 28 years, a general uptrend was observed across all modalities.


An overview of the graph indicates that road transportation consistently surpassed other modes, evidencing a robust incline from approximately 70 million tonnes to just shy of 100 million tonnes over the given period. Meanwhile, water-borne freight also exhibited a steady, albeit more modest, rise.


Delving into specifics, road transport not only dominated in volume but also showed the most pronounced growth, solidifying its position as the primary mode for the quantities of goods transported in the UK. The initial figure near 70 million tonnes burgeoned to an impressive near 100 million tonnes by 2002. This mode's relentless ascent underscores its pivotal role in the UK's freight system.


In contrast, water transport, while holding second place in terms of volume, displayed a relatively tranquil progression, hovering around the 60 million tonne mark towards the end of the timeframe. Rail and pipeline, initially comparable in the quantities of goods transported in the early years, diverged as rail transport exhibited a volatile pattern, with a slight upward trend peaking at around 40 million tonnes. Pipelines, albeit starting as the least utilized mode at roughly 10 million tonnes, achieved a steady increase, stabilizing above 20 million tonnes post-1994.


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Model Answer 2

The line graph elucidates the quantities of goods transported in the UK from 1974 to 2002, delineated across four distinct transportation modes: road, water, rail, and pipeline.


In an overarching view, a progressive enhancement in the quantities of goods transported in the UK via all modalities is depicted over the span of nearly three decades. Remarkably, the transportation of goods by road, in particular, saw a substantial escalation.


Delving into the specifics, road transport exhibited a steady ascent from approximately 70 million tonnes in 1974, culminating near the 100 million tonnes threshold by 2002, underscoring its dominance in the logistics sector. Concurrently, the quantities of goods transported in the UK via water and pipeline, though starting from more modest baselines of under 40 and 5 million tonnes respectively, followed an upward trajectory. By the close of the period, water-borne transport had just breached the 60 million tonnes mark, while pipeline transport experienced a quadruple increase, surpassing 20 million tonnes.


Conversely, rail transport diverged from this growth pattern. Commencing at 40 million tonnes, a discernible dip occurred, bottoming out at around 30 million tonnes in the mid-1980s. Thereafter, rail transport fluctuated before a resurgence, realigning with its initial figure slightly above 40 million tonnes by 2002, albeit not mirroring the robust growth of other transport means.


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Model Answer 3

The line graph presents an analysis of the quantities of goods transported in the UK from 1974 to 2002, segmented by four distinctive transport modalities: road, water, rail, and pipeline. It offers a clear depiction of the transport trends over a span of nearly three decades.


An overview of the graph highlights a consistent upward trajectory in the quantities of goods transported via road, water, and pipeline. Road transport, in particular, maintained a dominant position, indicating its central role in the UK's goods transportation network. The trend for rail, however, contrasts with the others, displaying minor fluctuations over the years but ultimately showing negligible growth.


Delving into the specifics, road transport exhibited a steady climb from approximately 70 million tonnes to just under 100 million tonnes over the observed period. This mode of transport consistently accounted for the lion's share of goods movement, underscoring its criticality in the UK's transportation framework. Water-borne freight also rose from about 40 million tonnes to over 60 million tonnes, reflecting a substantial growth in its utilization for moving goods.


Conversely, rail transport demonstrated a varied pattern, with a slight decrease in the late 1970s, followed by periods of both increase and decrease. By 2002, the quantities of goods transported by rail had marginally increased from its initial figures, resting at just above 40 million tonnes. Pipeline transport, albeit starting from a lower base of approximately 2 million tonnes, showed a remarkable rise, concluding at about 20 million tonnes.



Model Answer 4

The line chart presents a comparative analysis of the quantities of goods transported in the UK from 1974 through to 2002, segmented by four distinct conveyance methods.


The overview of the data indicates a predominant increase across the board for the quantities of goods transported via road, water, and rail, with road transport showing a marked ascendancy. In contrast, pipeline transport displayed a plateau from the mid-90s onwards.


Focusing on the specifics, road transport experienced a steady upward trajectory, commencing at just over 70 million tonnes and culminating at around 100 million tonnes, thus indicating a significant growth over the 28-year period. Water transport also escalated but with less volatility, beginning at around 40 million tonnes and finishing the period just shy of the 60 million tonnes mark.


Rail transport and pipeline had more nuanced trends. Rail started at approximately 40 million tonnes, dipping in the early '80s before regaining momentum to reach about 50 million tonnes by 2002. Pipeline usage, while initially negligible, rose sharply to 20 million tonnes by 1982 and from then on remained consistently at this level, unaffected by the fluctuations seen in the other modes of transportation.



Model Answer 5

The line chart provides an overview of the movement of goods in the UK from 1974 to 2002, detailing four different transportation modes: road, water, rail, and pipeline. Quantities are denoted in million tonnes.


Overall, three out of four transportation modes experienced a growth in the quantity of goods transported over this period, with rail being the exception.


Road transportation dominated, enduring a temporary decline between 1978 and 1982 before a robust escalation, peaking at approximately 100 million tonnes in 2002. Waterways presented a stable mode of transport, experiencing a slight rise initially from 40 to just under 60 million tonnes, maintaining this level for twelve subsequent years. After a minor setback in 1998, it rebounded strongly to exceed 60 million tonnes in 2002. Additionally, pipeline usage displayed a steady increase, with a few periods of stagnation, ultimately tripling its initial value by 2002.


In contrast, rail transport exhibited a downward trend until 1994. This descent was followed by a recovery phase that saw it regain its initial position by 2002, mirroring its 1974 level. Therefore, while road transportation remained the most popular method for goods movement, other modes also saw notable usage.



Model Answer 6

The provided line graph delineates the trend in goods transportation in the UK, spanning from 1974 to 2002, across four distinct mediums: road, water, rail, and pipeline, with quantities represented in million tonnes.


Predominantly, three out of the four transport modes manifested a growth trajectory across the period, while rail transport was the outlier.


Road transport was the preeminent mode, witnessing a transient downturn from 1974 to 1982 prior to experiencing a pronounced ascension, culminating at an apex of roughly 100 million tonnes by 2002. In the same vein, water transport initially escalated from 40 to just shy of 60 million tonnes, plateauing at this level for the ensuing dozen years. Despite experiencing a minor dip in 1998, a substantial resurgence saw it surpass the 60-million-tonne threshold by 2002.


Concurrently, pipeline utilization evinced a gradual yet consistent proliferation, interspersed with brief stagnant phases, ultimately attaining a threefold increase in volume by 2002.


Conversely, rail transport underwent a period of progressive decline until 1994. However, a subsequent revival phase allowed it to reattain its initial volume by 2002, effectively reverting to its standing in 1974. Overall, while road transportation unequivocally held sway, other modes also registered significant usage, underscoring the multifaceted nature of goods movement in the UK throughout these three decades.


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