top of page

Average Household Expenditures in a Country in 1950 and 2010 - Task 1 Pie Charts

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The pie charts below show the average household expenditures in a country in 1950 and 2010.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.

Average Household Expenditures in a Country in 1950 and 2010 Task 1 Pie Charts

Get your personalised IELTS Essay Feedback from a former examiner


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Model Answer 1

The pair of pie charts illustrates shifts in the average household expenditures in a country across six decades, spotlighting categories such as housing, food, healthcare, education, and transportation in 1950 and 2010.


At first glance, it is evident that food and housing were the dominant categories of average household expenditures in the country during 1950, whereas by 2010, spending had diversified significantly, with a marked rise in the financial allocation to food. This highlights a transformation in spending habits over time, suggesting a shift in socio-economic priorities.


Diving deeper, the year 1950 was characterized by a heavy focus on housing, absorbing a substantial 72.1% of household expenses, while food constituted 11.2%. Fast forward sixty years, food emerged as the top expenditure at 34%, overtaking housing, which now accounted for 22% of the budget. Notably, healthcare maintained its position as the least significant expense in both years, despite a modest increase.


Transportation and 'Other' categories saw a substantial uptick in the budget by 2010. Transportation costs jumped from a mere 3.3% to 14%, reflecting perhaps changes in mobility and commuting patterns. Similarly, spending on miscellaneous items quadrupled, from 4.4% to 19.3%. Education, while still a minor segment, showed a slight decrement in its share, hinting at an evolution in investment in human capital over the six decades.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Model Answer 2

The provided visual aids juxtapose the proportion of average household expenditures in a country within various categories between the years 1950 and 2010.


An immediate overview reveals a drastic metamorphosis in spending patterns over the sixty-year span, with a notable diversification in the average household expenditures in a country. In 1950, housing and food significantly overshadowed other expenses, while 2010 saw food ascending to the pinnacle of spending priorities, with housing costs trailing behind.


In the mid-20th century landscape, a colossal 72.1% of the average household expenditures in a country were dedicated to housing, indicative of its priority in post-war society. Concurrently, food, the second-largest expense, claimed 11.2%. In stark contrast, the 2010 chart illustrates a profound shift, where food expenses ballooned to 34%, becoming the most significant outlay, while housing expenditure receded to 22%. This reversal in dominance elucidates evolving economic and social structures.


Healthcare expenditure, albeit the smallest fraction, saw a gradual increase over the decades. Meanwhile, transportation spending catapulted from a modest 3.3% to a more substantial 14%, reflecting the burgeoning importance of mobility in contemporary life. Expenditures on education dipped slightly, whereas the category labeled 'Other' swelled from 4.4% to 19.2%, signaling an expansion in consumer goods and services.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Model Answer 3

The diagrams present a comparative analysis of the average household expenditures in a country, dissecting the financial allocation across various sectors in the years 1950 and 2010.


The overarching trend shown by the diagrams is a dramatic shift in the allocation of average household expenditures in a country. There was a significant re-prioritization from housing to food over the six-decade interval, along with a marked diversification in spending.


In the initial period under review, a staggering 72.1% of the average household expenditures in a country were apportioned to housing. Food, although a distant second, still comprised a notable 11.2% of the total spending. Fast forward to 2010, and the expenditure landscape had undergone a remarkable transformation. Food emerged as the leading expense, capturing 34% of the average household expenditures in a country, surpassing housing, which now constituted 22%.


The tertiary expenses, while less dominant, also reflect notable changes. Healthcare, despite remaining the least significant expense, registered a slight increase over time. In a significant upsurge, transportation expenses quadrupled to 14%, possibly echoing the enhanced mobility needs of a modern society. Conversely, the financial investment in education saw a marginal decrease, whereas the 'Other' category witnessed a fourfold increase to 19.2%, perhaps indicative of a more diverse consumer culture.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Model Answer 4

The pie charts offer a visual comparison of the average household expenditures in a country, contrasting the financial distribution across various categories in two distinct years, 1950 and 2010.


A cursory overview indicates a striking transition in the average household expenditures in a country. From a dominance of housing costs in 1950 to an expanded expenditure on food in 2010, the data signals a shift in economic disbursements over time.


Focusing on the specifics, the earlier chart denotes that housing previously consumed the lion's share of the average household expenditures in a country, at a formidable 72.1%. In comparison, the food category was the next substantial expense, amounting to 11.2%. Contrastingly, the latter year's chart reveals a pivotal change: food expenditure swelled to become the most significant expense at 34%, while housing's share contracted to 22% of the average household expenditures in a country.


Furthermore, transportation costs witnessed a remarkable surge from a paltry 3.3% to a more pronounced 14%, possibly mirroring the evolution of transit infrastructure and individual mobility. The 'Other' category's increase to 19.2% suggests a broadening in the variety of goods and services consumed by households. Meanwhile, educational spending exhibited a minimal decrease, subtly reflecting on the changing priorities in household budgeting.


Get your personalised IELTS Essay Feedback from a former examiner


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score

0 comments

Comentarios

Obtuvo 0 de 5 estrellas.
Aún no hay calificaciones

Agrega una calificación
bottom of page