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CO2 Emissions for Different Forms of Transport in the European Union - Task 1 Multiple Graphs

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graph below shows CO2 emissions for different forms of transport in the European Union. The Pie Chart shows the percentage of European Union funds being spent on different forms of transport.


Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information in the graph below.


Write at least 150 words.


CO2 emissions for different forms of transport in the European Union - Task 1 Bar Chart
percentage of European Union funds being spent on different forms of transport - Task 1 Pie Charts

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Model Answer 1

The illustration provides a comparative analysis of CO2 emissions for different forms of transport within the European Union, alongside a pie chart detailing the allocation of EU funds across various transportation sectors.


Overall, it is immediately apparent that aviation stands as the predominant contributor to CO2 emissions per kilometer for a single passenger, whilst EU funding is primarily channeled into road infrastructure.


Delving into specifics, the bar chart elucidates that air transport is responsible for approximately 375 grams of CO2 per passenger-kilometer, a stark contrast to the emissions from passenger cars, which register at around 130 grams. Public transportation modes such as buses, coaches, and maritime services showcase a more environmentally friendly profile, with CO2 emissions hovering near the 50-70 gram mark for each passenger-kilometer journey. Rail transport demonstrates a commendable efficiency with emissions just under those of coaches and maritime vessels.


On the fiscal front, the pie chart depicts a clear prioritization, with over half of the EU budget being allocated to road transport, signifying an investment strategy potentially at odds with the CO2 emissions data. Railways enjoy a substantial 31% investment, reflecting the EU's support for this lower-emission transport mode. Interestingly, despite its high CO2 footprint, air transport sees a mere 1% of the budget, an indication of either a strategic underinvestment or a commitment to minimize the environmental impact of the sector. Other transport systems collectively constitute a small fraction of the budget, aligning with their minor role in CO2 emissions for different forms of transport within the EU framework.


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Model Answer 2

The provided visuals succinctly contrast the CO2 emissions for different forms of transport in the European Union with the corresponding fiscal allocation by the EU for each transport sector. The dual representation encapsulates the dichotomy between environmental impact and economic investment in transportation.


An overarching glance at the graphics reveals two pivotal trends: firstly, the disproportionate CO2 emissions for different forms of transport attributed to air travel, and secondly, the EU's financial commitment which is predominantly directed towards road transport infrastructure.


Scrutinizing the bar graph, we observe an alarming disparity with air transport eclipsing other modes by generating roughly 375 grams of CO2 per passenger per kilometer. This is in stark contrast to terrestrial modes like passenger cars and buses, which emit considerably lower quantities of CO2, at approximately 130 grams and 70 grams respectively. Coaches, maritime, and rail transport showcase commendably lower emissions, all contributing less than 70 grams of CO2 for the same distance, underscoring their environmental efficiency.


The fiscal landscape painted by the pie chart further deepens the discourse, with an overwhelming 52% of the EU's transport budget funneled into roadways. Rail transport, though more eco-friendly, receives a significant but lesser 31%. Public transport, which is relatively more efficient in terms of CO2 emissions for different forms of transport, is allocated a mere 10%, laying bare the incongruities within the funding distribution. Air transport, despite its hefty carbon footprint, garners only a sliver of the financial pie, highlighting a potential area for policy recalibration in light of CO2 emission concerns. The remaining budget is sparsely distributed among other sectors, mirroring their minimal CO2 emissions impact.


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Model Answer 3

The graphic elucidation presents a stark depiction of CO2 emissions for different forms of transport across the European Union juxtaposed with the proportional allocation of EU funds across these transportation modalities.


A synthesized overview of the data indicates a substantial CO2 emissions footprint from air travel, towering over other transport forms, while EU funding exhibits a strong inclination towards road transport infrastructure.


Turning to a granular analysis, the bar chart delineates that CO2 emissions for different forms of transport vary dramatically, with air travel emitting an alarming 375 grams of CO2 per passenger-kilometer. This figure significantly overshadows the emissions from passenger cars, which stand at 130 grams, and doubles the emissions of bus passengers, noted at around 65 grams per kilometer. Meanwhile, coaches, maritime, and rail transports are comparatively modest CO2 contributors, each accounting for approximately 50 grams per passenger-kilometer, showcasing a greener footprint in the EU's transport tapestry.


Contrasting with the emissions data, the EU's budgetary focus, as shown by the pie chart, is predominantly on road transport, absorbing a hefty 52% of funds. Rail systems are the recipient of a substantial 31%, suggesting a nod towards promoting less polluting transport options. Public transportation, an efficient player in reducing CO2 emissions for different forms of transport, is allocated a mere 10%. Surprisingly, air transport, despite its high emissions, receives a minuscule 1-2% alongside other lesser-used transport infrastructures, painting a complex picture of the EU's funding strategy against its CO2 emission landscape.


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Model Answer 4

The accompanying charts provide an analysis of CO2 emissions for different forms of transport within the European Union and detail the proportional distribution of EU financial support among these transport modes.


At first glance, the most striking data point is the disproportionate CO2 emissions from air travel, markedly higher than those of other transportation forms, in stark contrast to the EU's predominant investment in road transport infrastructure.


Detailing the specifics, the bar graph reveals that air travel is associated with the highest CO2 emissions for different forms of transport, contributing an estimated 375 grams of CO2 per passenger-kilometer. In comparison, the emissions from passenger cars are significantly lower, at approximately 130 grams, and bus travel further halves this figure to around 65 grams. Coaches, maritime, and rail travel produce the least emissions, each hovering around the 50-gram mark, suggesting a more sustainable approach to passenger transport within the EU.


Financial allocations, as illustrated in the pie chart, reveal a curious narrative: roads receive a lion's share of EU funds, amounting to 52%, despite the relatively moderate CO2 emissions associated with car travel. Rail transport, a lower emitter of CO2, is granted a sizeable 31%, hinting at a balanced approach between efficiency and environmental stewardship. Public transport, efficient in minimizing CO2 emissions for different forms of transport, is accorded only 10% of the funds. It is notable that air transport, with its high emissions, garners a paltry 1-2% of the budget, possibly reflecting a strategic decision to limit its expansion due to environmental concerns.



Model Answer 5

The provided visuals delineate the CO2 emissions for different forms of transport within the European Union and the allocation of EU funds across various transport sectors.


An immediate observation from the visuals is the stark contrast in CO2 emissions for different forms of transport, with air travel far exceeding other modes in terms of pollution per passenger kilometer. Simultaneously, EU funding distribution appears heavily skewed towards road infrastructure, despite roads not being the highest contributor to CO2 emissions per passenger kilometer.


In detail, the bar graph indicates a disproportionate amount of CO2 emissions for different forms of transport, with aviation towering at over 350 grams per passenger kilometer, a figure that starkly overshadows the emissions from passenger cars, which stand at approximately 130 grams. Meanwhile, public transports like buses, maritime services, and rail collectively maintain a moderate emission rate hovering around 50 grams, and coaches commendably report the least, dipping below the 50-gram mark.


Contrasting this data with EU spending patterns, the pie chart reveals a hefty 52% of funds are channeled into road systems. Railways, benefiting from a substantial 31% investment, sit at a distant second, followed by a mere 10% for public transport. The remaining percentages are distributed among intermodal facilities, inland waterways, ports, and airports, with a sliver allocated to unspecified sectors.


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