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Daily Consumption of Three Spreads Per Person from 1981 to 2007 - Task 1 Line Graph Report

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graph below shows the daily consumption of three spreads per person from 1981 to 2007 in a country.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.


Daily Consumption of Three Spreads Per Person from 1981 to 2007 - Task 1 Line Graph Report

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Model Answer 1 (Band 9)

The provided line graph illustrates the trends in daily consumption of three types of spreads—margarine, butter, and low fat & reduced spreads—per person from 1981 to 2007 in a particular country. The units are measured in grams.


From an overarching perspective, the graph indicates a marked shift in consumer preference, highlighted by the emergence and subsequent dominance of low fat & reduced spreads post-1996. Initially, butter was the preferred choice, with its consumption surpassing that of margarine, which saw a fluctuating yet overall declining trend.


In 1981, butter's popularity was evident with a daily consumption just above 140 grams per person, contrasting with margarine's consumption, which was slightly below 100 grams. The next five years witnessed a burgeoning preference for butter, with its consumption peaking, while margarine's usage saw a downward trajectory. By 1991, an intersection occurred, with both butter and margarine being consumed at approximately the same rate, following which margarine's consumption plateaued until 1996. Concurrently, butter's appeal waned significantly, dropping to a mere 65 grams.


The introduction of low fat & reduced spreads in 1996 marked a turning point. This new entrant experienced a meteoric rise, quickly becoming the most consumed spread by 2001, with a peak daily intake of around 80 grams. In stark contrast, the traditional spreads experienced a waning demand, with both butter and margarine's consumption dwindling to approximately 45 and 40 grams respectively by 2007. This shift mirrors the growing health consciousness among consumers, as evidenced by the rapid adoption of the healthier alternative spread.


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Model Answer 2 (Band 9)

The line graph presents a comparative analysis of the daily consumption of three different spreads per person—namely margarine, butter, and low fat & reduced spreads—tracked over a span of 26 years, from 1981 to 2007, within a specified country.


An overview of the data reveals a significant transformation in consumer preferences for spreads over the given period. Initially dominated by butter, the landscape altered with the advent of low fat & reduced spreads, which not only disrupted but eventually led the market. Both butter and margarine experienced an overall decline in daily consumption per person, while low fat & reduced spreads surged in popularity post their introduction.


In 1981, the daily consumption of butter per individual was notably high, exceeding 140 grams, while margarine was utilized to a lesser extent, slightly below 100 grams. Over the next five years, butter enjoyed a crescendo in usage, in contrast to margarine, which took a downward dip. By 1991, a convergence in the consumption patterns of both spreads occurred, thereafter, margarine's usage remained relatively stable until 1996. Butter, however, faced a significant drop, plummeting to around 65 grams per person.


The year 1996 was pivotal with the introduction of low fat & reduced spreads, which radically gained favour, reaching a consumption peak of approximately 80 grams per person by 2001. Concurrently, the daily intake of traditional spreads declined, with both butter and margarine falling to near 45 and 40 grams respectively by the end of 2007. This trend reflects an evident shift towards health-conscious dietary choices among the populace, as the preference for spreads with reduced fat content became increasingly pronounced.


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Model Answer 3 (Band 9)

The line graph meticulously delineates the daily consumption trends of three distinct spreads—butter, margarine, and low fat & reduced spreads—among individuals in a certain country over a period from 1981 to 2007.


At a glance, the graph narrates a tale of evolving dietary preferences over a quarter-century, with a notable pivot towards healthier alternatives. The rise of low fat & reduced spreads after their introduction is the most striking trend, overshadowing the declining use of butter and the marginal fluctuations of margarine consumption.


In the initial year charted, 1981, butter was the preeminent spread with daily consumption per person exceeding the 140-gram mark, while margarine's usage was less favoured, falling just shy of 100 grams. The subsequent half-decade witnessed an uptick in butter's popularity, reaching its zenith, while margarine's appeal took a slight dip. By the year 1991, the consumption paths of these spreads intersected, followed by a period of stability for margarine until 1996. During the same interval, butter saw its fortunes wane dramatically, diminishing to around 65 grams per person.


Entering the scene in 1996, low fat & reduced spreads rapidly ascended to become the spread of choice, with daily consumption surging to roughly 80 grams per individual by 2001. This ascent coincided with a steady decline in the traditional favourites, with butter and margarine's intake dwindling to about 45 and 40 grams respectively by 2007. The graph thus encapsulates a distinct shift in consumer behaviour, with health-conscious decisions evidently influencing the daily consumption of spreads per person.

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