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Electricity Production by Fuel Source in Australia and France in 1980 and 2000 - Task 1 Pie Charts

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The pie charts below show units of electricity production by fuel source in Australia and France in 1980 and 2000.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words

Electricity Production by Fuel Source in Australia and France in 1980 and 2000 - Task 1 Pie Charts

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Model Answer 1

The provided diagrams delineate the units of electricity production by fuel source in Australia and France across two distinct years, 1980 and 2000.


At a glance, the most striking change is the stark increase in nuclear energy's contribution to France's electricity production by 2000, contrasting with Australia's heightened reliance on coal. Australia did not adopt nuclear power, while France's shift towards this energy source is markedly evident.


In 1980, Australia's electricity, totaling 100 units, was predominantly sourced from coal, which constituted half of the production. Natural gas and hydroelectric power each generated 20 units, while oil contributed the least with 10 units. Fast forward two decades, and Australia's electricity production surged by 70%, with coal's share increasing substantially. In contrast, contributions from natural gas and oil diminished significantly, suggesting a consolidation towards coal reliance.


Conversely, France's energy landscape underwent a radical transformation. The initial split among coal, natural gas, and nuclear power, with hydroelectric power at the periphery, shifted dramatically by 2000. The use of nuclear power soared from 15 to 126 units, eclipsing all other sources and accounting for the majority of the 180 units of electricity produced.


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Model Answer 2

The comparative pie charts elucidate the units of electricity production by fuel source in Australia and France across the years 1980 and 2000.


In an overarching perspective, a striking transformation is observed in the energy mix of both countries. Australia's reliance on coal intensified, while France's electricity production underwent a nuclear revolution by the turn of the millennium.


Delving into specifics, Australia's coal dependency in 1980 accounted for exactly half of its electricity production, tallying 50 units. By 2000, this figure had ballooned to 130 units, constituting an overwhelming majority of the total 170 units produced. Notably, other sources like oil, which was the least utilized at a mere 10 units in 1980, alongside natural gas and nuclear power, all dwindled to just 4 units each two decades later.


Contrastingly, France's energy landscape in 1980 showcased a more balanced distribution among coal, natural gas, and oil, each contributing 25 units, and hydro power at 5 units. Fast forward to 2000, nuclear power surged to the forefront with a staggering 126 units, an almost threefold increase, signaling a seismic shift towards this energy source. This growth relegated the contributions of natural gas to a minuscule 2 units, marking a significant retreat from its earlier position.


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Model Answer 3

The provided visual data compares the units of electricity production by fuel source in Australia and France in the twin milestones of 1980 and 2000.


In an overarching view, a marked difference in energy profiles between the two countries emerges, alongside a significant increase in total electricity production over the two decades. Specifically, while Australia's reliance on coal intensified, France's energy landscape was revolutionized by nuclear power.


Delving into the specifics for Australia, the total units of electricity production by fuel source burgeoned from 100 units in 1980 to 170 in 2000, with coal remaining the predominant source. Notably, the share of coal-fired electricity jumped from 50% to an overwhelming 76%, equating to 130 units. Conversely, the contribution from natural gas and oil witnessed a decline, overshadowed by a modest rise in hydroelectric power from 10 to 26 units.


Transitioning to France, the increase in electricity production was equally impressive, doubling from 90 units to 180 over the same period. The standout transformation was the ascendancy of nuclear power, skyrocketing from a mere 15 units to 126, thus constituting 70% of the total in 2000. This nuclear surge drastically reduced the reliance on other sources, as hydroelectric power plateaued and the roles of coal and natural gas diminished.


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Model Answer 4

The pie charts provide a comparative illustration of the units of electricity production by fuel source in Australia and France across two decades, 1980 and 2000.


A striking trend apparent from the charts is the substantial increase in total units of electricity production in both nations, with figures approximately doubling over the 20-year span. While the aggregate growth is similar, the allocation of fuel sources for electricity production reveals distinct patterns between the two countries.


In Australia, a significant shift is observed away from oil and natural gas, which, combined, fell from 30 units to a mere 4 units. Hydropower, on the other hand, maintained a steady contribution in both years. Contrastingly, France's energy portfolio underwent a radical transformation with nuclear power surging from 15 units to 126 units, positioning it as the predominant source of electricity in 2000.


Coal's role in Australia remained unchanged, reflecting a consistent reliance on this resource. However, France's reliance on coal diminished as nuclear power took precedence, demonstrating a pivot towards this energy source. The constancy in hydroelectric power in Australia, juxtaposed with the nuclear revolution in France, underscores a divergent approach to electricity production.



Model Answer 5

The pie charts present a comparative illustration of the units of electricity production by fuel source in Australia and France, measured at two distinct points in time, 1980 and 2000. A closer examination reveals a marked evolution in energy mix preferences in both nations over the span of two decades.


An overarching trend discernible from the charts is the stark contrast in the energy strategies adopted by Australia and France. In 1980, Australia relied heavily on coal, with half of its electricity output stemming from this resource, while France's production was more evenly distributed across coal, natural gas, and oil. By the year 2000, Australia had intensified its use of coal, which then accounted for a substantial 76% of its increased electricity production, overshadowing all other sources. Conversely, France's strategy shifted dramatically towards nuclear power, which grew from a minor 17% to an overwhelming 70% of its electricity production, signaling a pivot away from fossil fuels.


Delving into specifics, Australia's coal-powered electricity production surged from 50 to 130 units, a leap that underscores the country's growing energy demands and a sustained reliance on coal. Meanwhile, the usage of natural gas and oil waned significantly, mirroring a global trend of moving away from these sources. France's trajectory was marked by an ambitious embrace of nuclear energy, which saw an eightfold increase from 15 to 126 units. This seismic shift in the French energy landscape reduced the reliance on traditional sources, with hydro power's share remaining relatively stable.


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