top of page

How People in a European City Reached their Office and Got Back Home in 1959 and 2009 - IELTS Task 1 Sample Report

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graphs below show how people in a European city reached their office and got back home in 1959 and 2009.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.


How People in a European City Reached their Office and Got Back Home in 1959 and 2009 - IELTS Task 1 Sample Report

Get your personalised IELTS Essay Feedback from a former examiner


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Sample Answer 1 (Band 9)

The provided pie charts offer a compelling comparison of the modes of transportation used by the residents of a European city for their work commute in the years 1959 and 2009.


It's evident that the primary mode of commute has shifted dramatically from pedestrian to automotive over the 50-year span. In 1959, a significant majority of 55% chose to walk, which starkly contrasts with the 25% observed in 2009. This shift is mirrored by the remarkable increase in car usage, soaring from a mere 10% to a substantial 35%.


The reliance on buses saw a slight decrease, moving from 15% down to 13%. Interestingly, the use of trains remained consistently chosen by 15% of commuters across both years. The 'other' category witnessed a growth, suggesting a diversification in transportation options over time.


Furthermore, the average distance and duration of commutes have also undergone notable changes. In 1959, the journey was relatively short, averaging 3.5 km and taking 17 minutes. By 2009, these figures had increased significantly, with the average distance reaching 19 km and the duration extending to 42 minutes. This reflects not only changes in urban development and expansion but also advancements in transportation technology allowing for faster travel over longer distances.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Sample Answer 2 (Band 8.5)

The pie charts provide a comparative insight into the modes of transportation utilized by residents for their commutes to and from work in a European city at two distinct points in time: 1959 and 2009.


In an overarching view, the charts illustrate a marked shift from walking to driving over the 50-year span. The period saw a significant decline in the proportion of pedestrians and a corresponding rise in car usage. Moreover, the data shows that the average commute became longer and the duration extended, indicating changes in urban development and commuting patterns.


Delving into specifics, the year 1959 was characterized by a majority (55%) preferring to walk, a choice that saw a reduction by 2009, dropping to 25%. Car usage, conversely, rose from 10% to 35%, indicating a dramatic change in commuting preferences. The usage of buses dipped slightly from 15% to 13%, while the proportion of train commuters held steady at 15%, suggesting a consistent reliance on rail transport.


The 'other' category, encompassing various modes of transportation, also saw an increase from 5% to 12%, possibly reflecting an introduction of new transport means or a diversification in commuter choices. The average distance of commutes more than quintupled from 3.5 km to 19 km, and the average duration increased by 25 minutes, reflecting a trend towards longer and potentially more efficient commutes over time.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Sample Answer 3 (Band 8)

The pie charts offer a breakdown of the commuting preferences of individuals in a European city during the years 1959 and 2009, revealing shifts in transit choices for work-related travel.


An overview of the data indicates a drastic transition from walking to driving over the half-century. Whereas the pedestrian commute was overwhelmingly predominant in 1959, car usage escalated dramatically by 2009. There was a nominal decrease in the use of buses, while train travel maintained a steady patronage. Additionally, the expansion in the 'other' category and the average commute distance and time reflect significant changes.


In 1959, a substantial 55% of commuters walked to their workplaces, a figure that shrank to 25% by 2009. Conversely, the preference for cars surged from 10% to 35%, suggesting a major cultural and infrastructural transformation. Bus utilization experienced a slight decline from 15% to 13%, possibly indicating a shift towards more personal or rapid transit modes.


Train travel remained a consistent choice for 15% of the city's workforce across the decades, underscoring its continued relevance in urban transport. The 'other' means of transport also saw an increase, hinting at the introduction of new commuting options. The journey to work became longer and more time-consuming, with the average distance leaping to 19 km in 42 minutes in 2009 from a brief 3.5 km in 17 minutes in 1959, suggesting greater residential dispersion or improved speed of vehicles.


Get your personalised IELTS Essay Feedback from a former examiner


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score

Kommentare


bottom of page