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Main Reasons Why Agricultural Land Becomes less Productive, and How These Causes Affected - IELTS Task 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The pie chart below shows the main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive. The table shows how these causes affected three regions of the world during the 1990s.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words

Main Reasons Why Agricultural Land Becomes less Productive, and How These Causes Affected - IELTS Task 1

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Model Answer 1

The provided visuals delineate the principal factors contributing to the diminishing fertility of agricultural land and the impact of these causes on three distinct regions throughout the 1990s.


An overarching glance at the pie chart reveals that over-grazing stands out as the predominant cause of agricultural decline worldwide, responsible for a significant portion of the reduced productivity. Concurrently, the table presents a regional breakdown, illustrating the varying degrees to which these main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive have influenced North America, Europe, and Oceania during the 1990s.


Drilling down into the specifics, over-grazing emerges as the most substantial factor, rendering 35% of land less fertile on a global scale. This is closely followed by deforestation and over-cultivation, which account for 30% and 28% of the degradation, respectively. Other less prominent causes combine to form the remaining 7%. In the regional context, Europe appears to have been the most affected during the 1990s, with a 23% overall decrease in land productivity, predominantly due to over-cultivation and over-grazing.


Considering the affected three regions of the world during the 1990s, North America exhibited a relatively minor decrease in land productivity at 5%, with over-cultivation as the leading cause. Oceania, encompassing islands in the South Pacific such as Australia and New Zealand, experienced a 13% reduction, with no impact from over-cultivation.


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Model Answer 2

The chart and table provided illustrate the main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive, alongside the impacts of these reasons on North America, Europe, and Oceania during the 1990s. The pie chart delineates the global causes of land degradation, while the table compares the percentage of land degraded in the three regions due to these causes.


In an overarching view, it is conspicuous that over-grazing and deforestation emerge as the predominant main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive, jointly accounting for 65% of the global figures. On the other hand, over-cultivation and other factors contribute to a lesser extent.


Delving into specifics, over-grazing takes the lead as the most significant cause of degradation, affecting 35% of lands worldwide, with deforestation close behind at 30%. Over-cultivation, although less pronounced, is still responsible for 28% of degradation. The residual 7% is attributed to other unspecified causes. These factors variably affected three regions of the world during the 1990s, with distinct regional disparities in the extent of land degradation.


In Europe, deforestation was the most significant factor, responsible for 9.8% of the land degradation during the 1990s. This was considerably higher than the land affected by over-cultivation and over-grazing within the region. Conversely, Oceania's main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive were dominated by over-grazing, which accounted for 11.3% out of a total 13% land degradation. North America presented a different pattern, with over-cultivation being the leading cause, at 3.3%, albeit the overall percentage of land degraded was the lowest of the three regions, at just 5%.


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Model Answer 3

The illustration presents an in-depth analysis of the main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive, further illustrating how these factors impacted North America, Europe, and Oceania during the 1990s. The pie chart delineates the global causation percentages, while the table offers a regional breakdown of the same issues.


The overview reveals that over-grazing emerges as the predominant global factor for land degradation, accounting for 35%, with deforestation and over-cultivation also contributing significantly. Regionally, Europe is the most affected area, with a total land degradation percentage nearly five times that of North America.


A detailed examination of the pie chart shows that, after over-grazing, deforestation and over-cultivation are the other two principal reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive, with 30% and 28% respectively. The 'other' category accounts for a minor 7%. The table allows for a comparative analysis of how these causes affected three regions of the world during the 1990s, providing specific numerical insights.


In Europe, deforestation stands out as the chief culprit, leading to 9.8% of land degradation, significantly surpassing the figures for over-cultivation and over-grazing within the region. Conversely, in Oceania, over-grazing takes precedence, affecting 11.3% of the land, while over-cultivation does not feature as a contributing factor. North America presents a contrasting scenario where over-cultivation leads to 3.3% of its land degradation, the highest among the three causes.


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Model Answer 4

The provided illustrations delineate the primary factors contributing to the diminished fertility of agricultural terrain and their impact on trio of global regions throughout the 1990s.


An overview of the data reveals that overgrazing and deforestation emerge as the predominant causes of agricultural decline, accounting for a combined two-thirds of the loss in land productivity. Overcultivation also plays a significant role, representing nearly a third of the productivity downturn, while other factors contribute to a minimal extent.


Delving into regional specifics, Europe's agricultural decline, pegged at 23%, is predominantly due to deforestation, which alone precipitates a 9.8% drop in land productivity. Overcultivation and overgrazing also have substantial impacts in this region, each contributing to more than 5% of the decline. In stark contrast, Oceania, encompassing the South Pacific's vast archipelago along with Australia and New Zealand, exhibits a 13% decrease in agricultural yield, with overgrazing being the sole culprit, as overcultivation shows no influence. Lastly, North America's relatively modest 5% decline is dispersed across all three main reasons, with overcultivation being the most significant at 3.3%, followed by overgrazing and deforestation.

 


Model Answer 5

The illustration delineates the main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive, alongside a comparative analysis of how these factors influenced three distinct regions during the 1990s.


Commencing with an overview, it's evident that over-grazing was the principal culprit in land degradation globally, accounting for 35% of the deterioration. Following closely were deforestation and over-cultivation, each contributing to the issue significantly. The trio of these causes constituted a major part of the degradation, while other reasons collectively held a minor share of 7%.


In an in-depth regional examination, Europe emerged as the most affected, with deforestation being the dominant factor in the reduction of land productivity. Here, a staggering 23% of the land suffered degradation, with over-cultivation also playing a substantial role. On the other end of the spectrum lay North America, where a mere 5% of agricultural land experienced decline, primarily due to over-cultivation. Interestingly, in Oceania, over-grazing was a major concern, yet over-cultivation had no reported impact on land productivity, a unique regional characteristic.



Model Answer 6

The diagram and accompanying table illustrate the principal causes of reduced agricultural productivity globally and the impact of these causes on North America, Europe, and Oceania throughout the 1990s.


The overview of the data indicates that over-grazing and deforestation were the main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive, accounting for 65% of the degradation. Over-cultivation also played a significant role, contributing to 28% of the decline. These causes variably affected the three regions of the world during the 1990s, with Europe most adversely affected.


In Europe, deforestation was the primary contributor to the 23% of land degradation, a figure that starkly contrasts with the mere 0.2% in North America and 1.7% in Oceania. Over-cultivation also showed significant regional variations, with Europe reporting 7.7% and North America 3.3%, while Oceania remained unaffected by this issue. This indicates a stark geographical disparity in the main reasons why agricultural land becomes less productive.


Furthermore, the impact of over-grazing was greatest in Oceania, where it led to 11.3% of land degradation, compared to a lower 1.5% in North America. These figures underscore the unique environmental challenges faced by the affected three regions of the world during the 1990s.



Model Answer 7

The supplied graphics illustrate the primary factors contributing to the decrease in agricultural land productivity and the impact of these factors across three global regions in the 1990s.


An overview of the data reveals that over-grazing was the predominant cause of land degradation globally, accounting for 35% of the decline. This issue was most pronounced in Oceania, where it led to the highest regional degradation rates. In contrast, Europe was the most affected area overall, with 23% of its land degraded.


Diving deeper into the details, it is evident that the second most significant factor was deforestation, which was responsible for 30% of the degradation, closely followed by over-cultivation with 28%. Together, these three causes were behind 93% of the total land degradation observed, with the remaining 7% attributed to various other reasons.


Regionally, Europe's degradation was primarily due to deforestation and over-cultivation, which were more severe than in other regions. Oceania, inclusive of Australia, New Zealand, and a significant portion of the South Pacific, ranked second in terms of degradation impact. North America emerged as the region least affected by degradation, particularly in terms of deforestation.


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