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Number of Books that were Borrowed in Four Different Months in 2014 - Task 1 Multiple Graphs

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The line graph shows the number of books that were borrowed in four different months in 2014 from four village libraries, and the pie chart shows the percentages of books, by type, that were borrowed over this time.


Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.

number of books that were borrowed in four different months in 2014 from four village libraries_1
number of books that were borrowed in four different months in 2014 from four village libraries_2

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Model Answer 1 (Band 9)

The first graph depicts a dynamic trend in the number of books that were borrowed in four different months from four village libraries, presenting a vivid portrait of reading habits across a rural backdrop. The second graph slices into the literary preferences, showcasing the distribution of book genres chosen by the readers.


At a glance, the borrowing trends experienced significant fluctuations, and a predilection for fiction emerged as a clear preference amongst library patrons. Specifically, the graph illustrates a variable yet distinctive borrowing pattern that underscores the shifting popularity and usage of library resources.


In June 2014, Ryeslip library emerged as the most frequented, dispatching a remarkable 300 books. Close behind, Sutton Wood marked itself as another prominent hub with 250 books issued. Conversely, West Eaton and Church Mount started more modestly, with each lending 50 books to their visitors. Over the ensuing months, Ryeslip witnessed a gradual decline in numbers, distributing slightly over 150 books by September. Meanwhile, Sutton Wood displayed the most volatility, ultimately peaking at 300 books in September, effectively doubling the lending rate compared to its counterparts. Both West Eaton and Church Mount experienced a growth in their lending numbers, eventually aligning their output to 150 books each by the end of the observed period.


Turning to the genres, fiction unequivocally dominated the borrowing landscape, encompassing 43% of the total books borrowed. History and science genres maintained a steady parity, each accounting for 14% of the total, while biographies were a notch higher at 19%. Self-help books, though less prevalent, still captured the interest of 10% of the borrowers, indicating a tangible, if smaller, audience for personal development literature.


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Model Answer 2 (Band 9)

The dual charts present a comprehensive analysis of the number of books that were borrowed in four different months from a quartet of village libraries, alongside a breakdown of the literary genres preferred.


An overview reveals that the borrowing trends exhibit pronounced variances over the months, with an unmistakable partiality towards fiction manifesting among the library clientele. The data portrays a narrative of changing community engagement with these rural repositories of knowledge.


In detail, Ryeslip stood at the pinnacle of activity in June, issuing an impressive 300 volumes. Sutton Wood was not far behind, with a contribution of 250 tomes to its readers. West Eaton and Church Mount presented a more restrained front, each circulating a modest count of 50 books. As the months progressed, Ryeslip's initial lead diminished, settling just above the 150 mark by September. In contrast, Sutton Wood's lending figures oscillated before climbing to a peak of 300 books, a figure unmatched by the other institutions. West Eaton and Church Mount, meanwhile, displayed a steady incline in lending, converging at a distribution of 150 books each as autumn approached.


Dissecting the genre preferences, fiction secured the lion's share with 43%, casting other categories in the shade. History and science shared an equal slice of the pie at 14% each, while biographies claimed a slightly larger share at 19%. The self-help category, though representing the smallest fraction, still accounted for one in ten of the borrowed books, underscoring a consistent demand for this genre.


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Model Answer 3 (Band 9)

The provided graphical illustrations convey the number of books that were borrowed in four different months from a selection of village libraries, coupled with a genre-based segregation of the borrowed books.


Observing the overall patterns, the frequency of book borrowing demonstrated noticeable ebbs and flows, with fiction clearly being the most sought-after genre. The interplay of these two data sets offers an insightful glimpse into the reading tendencies within these communities.


Focusing on the specifics, the Ryeslip library experienced a bustling June, loaning out a zenith of 300 books. Meanwhile, the Sutton Wood library also saw considerable traffic, with 250 books issued. The West Eaton and Church Mount libraries were more conservative in their lending, each recording 50 loans. Moving through the months, Ryeslip's figures tapered off to just over 150 by September, whereas Sutton Wood's fluctuating statistics ultimately soared to 300. West Eaton and Church Mount demonstrated incremental growth, culminating in a parallel lending rate of 150 books each by the season's end.


In terms of genre preference, the pie chart indicates a dominant tilt towards fiction, claiming 43% of total borrowings. History and science maintained equilibrium, both constituting 14%, while biographies edged slightly higher at 19%. The niche for self-help was evident as well, securing a stable 10% of borrowings, reflecting a discrete but significant readership invested in personal growth.


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