top of page

Number of Children Ever Born to Women Aged 40-44 Years in Australia for Each Year - Task 1 Table

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The table below presents the number of children ever born to women aged 40-44 years in Australia for each year the information was collected since 1981.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words

Number of Children Ever Born to Women Aged 40-44 Years in Australia for Each Year - Task 1 Table

Get your personalised IELTS Essay Feedback from a former examiner


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Sample Answer 1

The chart presented offers an insightful exploration into the number of children ever born to women aged 40-44 years in Australia, charting the changes that unfolded across a span beginning in 1981 and concluding in 2006.


At a glance, the overarching trend indicates a clear propensity towards smaller families. This is evidenced by an increase in the proportion of women who have borne either none or one child, coupled with a decrease in those with two or more children over the 25-year timespan.


Detailing the specifics, the early 1980s witnessed 8.5% of women within this age group without offspring, a figure that rose to 9.7% by 1986. Concurrently, the segment of women with a single child also saw a rise from 7.6% to 8.7%. This contrasts with the substantial proportion of women with two children which hovered around 29% in 1981. The trend for larger families, however, with three or more children, accounted for a significant majority at that time.


Moving forward to the years 1996 and 2006, the data delineates an upwards trajectory for women without children and those with one child, exceeding 15% and 13% respectively. Conversely, the number of children ever born to women aged 40-44 years in Australia with two children showed negligible fluctuation, while there was a noticeable contraction in the percentages of those with three or four children.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Sample Answer 2

The dataset delineates the shifts in family size among Australian women in the 40-44 age bracket over a span of 25 years, commencing in 1981.


Commencing with an overview, it is manifest that there has been a marked decline in the number of children ever born to women aged 40-44 years in Australia opting for larger families, with a parallel increase in those choosing to remain childless or with a singleton.


Delving into the specifics, the year 1981 was notable for the highest percentage of women with four or more children at 27.6%, a figure which contracted significantly to 11.0% by 2006. This period also saw a marginal decrease in the prevalence of three-child families, from a peak of 27.4% in 1981 to 21.5% in 2006.


Conversely, the proportion of women without children has risen steadily, from 8.5% in 1981 to 15.9% in 2006. The frequency of one-child families experienced slight fluctuations, ultimately decreasing over the 25-year period. Women with two children, however, consistently represented the largest group, with figures peaking at 38.3% in 2006, only marginally higher than in 1996.


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score



Sample Answer 3

The tableau before us delineates the fertility patterns of Australian women within the 40-44 age bracket, specifically focusing on the number of children ever born to them, as recorded across four distinct years: 1981, 1986, 1996, and 2006.


From an overarching perspective, the most salient trend is the gradual yet discernible incline in the percentages of women with fewer offspring, juxtaposed with a decline in those with larger families. Indeed, this shift underscores a societal transition towards smaller family units over the 25-year period.


Delving into the minutiae, in 1981, a mere 8.5% of women in this age group had not borne any children—a figure that saw a slight uptick to 9.7% by 1986. Women with a single child represented 7.6% in the initial year surveyed, incrementing modestly to 8.7% five years thence. In stark contrast, the prevalence of women with two children was markedly higher at approximately 29%, with those having three or four (or more) children collectively accounting for over half of the demographic in question.


Fast forward a decade and another ten years, these figures for childless women and those with one offspring expanded to surpass 15% and 13%, respectively. Meanwhile, the proportion of women with two children remained relatively stable, whereas the percentages for those with three or four children progressively diminished. In essence, the data encapsulates a pivotal shift in the reproductive choices of Australian women aged 40-44, where the predilection for smaller families became increasingly pronounced from 1981 to 2006.



Sample Answer 4

The provided table chronicles the fertility patterns among Australian women aged 40-44, detailing the number of children ever born to them across four distinct years spanning from 1981 to 2006.


In terms of overarching trends, there was a noticeable transition towards smaller family sizes among women in the specified age group, with a significant uptick in those with no children and a downturn in families with three or more children. The data presents a clear inclination towards family size diminution over the quarter-century.


Focusing on the finer details, the year 1981 stood out with nearly a third of women in this age cohort having birthed four or more children, at 27.6%. This figure saw a steady and steep decline, culminating in a mere 11.0% by 2006. The proportion of women with three children followed a similar downward trajectory, albeit less pronounced, tapering from 27.4% in 1981 to 21.5% in 2006.


Meanwhile, the number of children ever born to women aged 40-44 years in Australia who had not borne any children was on the rise, climbing from 8.5% in 1981 to 15.9% in 2006. The category of women with a single child displayed a slight fluctuation over the years, ultimately showing a modest decrease. Notably, the group with two children persistently constituted the majority, with a peak in 2006, suggesting a societal pivot towards two-child norms among the number of children ever born to women aged 40-44 years in Australia.


Get your personalised IELTS Essay Feedback from a former examiner


Download IELTS eBooks, get everything you need to achieve a high band score

댓글


bottom of page