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Ages of the Populations of Yemen and Italy in 2000 and Projections for 2050 - Task 1 Pie Charts

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The charts below give information on the ages of the populations of Yemen and Italy in 2000 and projections for 2050.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words

Ages of the Populations of Yemen and Italy in 2000 and Projections for 2050 - Task 1 Pie Charts

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Sample Answer 1

The charts compare and forecast the scenario of three different age group population of Yemen and Italy during the period between 2000 and 2050.


Overall, though the Yemen’s middle age group is predicted to experience a significant rise, the percentage share of its youngest category is expected to fall in the same period. However, Italy follows a different path, its middle-aged group is forecasted to fall significantly in the 50-year period, though it is predicted to have a major increase in case of the oldest age group.


In Yemen, percentage share of 0-14 years of age is expected to decrease from 50 percent in 2000 to 37 percent in 2050. However, its share of 15-59-year-old people is estimated to follow a rising trend, which is anticipated to increase from 46.3 percent in 2000 to 57.3 percent in 2050. Percentage of the other group, 65+ aged population, would experience a minimal change, rising from 3.6 to 5.7 percent in this period.


On the other hand, Italy’s 15-59-year-old age group’s percentage share of total population is expected to fall drastically from 61.6 percent in 2000 to 46.2 percent in 2050. However, the 60+ year old category is envisioned to rise from 24.1 to 42.3 percent in this 50-year span. Meanwhile, at the same time, the age group 0-14 is predicted to go through a slight fall from 14.3 percent to 11.5 percent.


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Sample Answer 2

The presented pie charts delineate the demographic segmentation by age in Yemen and Italy for the year 2000, with projected distributions for 2050, encapsulating the ages of the populations of Yemen and Italy across distinct age brackets.


The overview of the charts highlights a significant demographic shift; both nations anticipate an expansion in their senior cohorts by 2050. While Yemen's youth remains a large demographic portion, Italy is expected to see a notable escalation in the prevalence of its elderly population.


Delving into specifics, Yemen's landscape in 2000 showed a youthful majority, with individuals aged 0-14 years comprising over half the population, at 50.1%. Adults aged 15-59 were also substantial at 46.3%, whereas the elderly, those 60 years and above, represented a mere 3.6%. Fast forward to 2050, a dramatic alteration is anticipated; the ages of the populations of Yemen are projected to invert somewhat, with adults set to constitute 57.3% of the populace, a noticeable upsurge from 2000. In parallel, the proportion of the youngest age group is predicted to decline to 37%. The senior segment, though still the smallest, is expected to increase to 5.7%.


Contrastingly, Italy's demographic in 2000 was predominantly adult with 61.6%, followed by a significant elderly population at 24.1%. Children aged 0-14 were the smallest group at 14.3%. By 2050, it is projected that the ages of the populations of Italy will undergo a striking transition, with the elderly expected to nearly double to 42.3%, closely trailing the adult segment, which is forecasted to decrease to 46.2%. Meanwhile, the youngest age group's share is projected to shrink to 11.5%, highlighting a continuation of Italy's aging demographic trend.


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Sample Answer 3

The pie charts delineate the demographic composition by age in Yemen and Italy at the turn of the millennium and project the same for the midpoint of the 21st century.


At a glance, the most striking distinction between the two nations is the significant youthful skew of Yemen's population versus the older demographic of Italy, a trend that is forecasted to persist into 2050. In 2000, Yemen boasted a youthful populace, with over half under 14 years and a mere sliver above 60. Conversely, Italy's population profile was mature, with a quarter aged 60 and above and less than 15% below 14 years.


Delving into specifics, Yemen's 2000 demographic was predominantly youthful, with those under 14 comprising 50.1%, while the 15-59 bracket accounted for 46.3%, and a scant 3.6% were seniors. In contrast, Italy's age distribution was more balanced yet aged, with 61.6% between 15-59 years, a substantial 24.1% aged 60 plus, and the young making up 14.3%.


Looking ahead to 2050, Yemen's demographic shifts subtly, with a reduction in the youngest category to 37%, a slight increase to 57.3% in the middle-age bracket, and a marginal rise in the elderly to 5.7%. Italy's future projection posits a dramatic aging, with the senior category swelling to 42.3%, the middle-age group shrinking to 46.2%, and the youth segment further contracting to 11.5%.


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Sample Answer 4

The pie charts offer a comparative analysis of the age distribution within the populations of Yemen and Italy at the turn of the millennium and project the demographic shifts anticipated by the year 2050.


Intriguingly, the overview of these diagrams suggests a universal aging trend, with a substantial surge in the senior demographic. Concurrently, there is an observable contraction in the proportion of the youngest age bracket across both nations. This demographic evolution underscores significant shifts in population structures, likely to impact societal constructs.


Yemen's age dynamics in 2000 depicted a youthful population, with just over half aged between 0-14 years. This youthful dominance is projected to diminish to 37% by 2050, a notable descent. Meanwhile, the senior segment (60+ years) is expected to incrementally ascend from 3.6% to 5.7%. The intermediate age group (15-59 years) is also set to expand, from 46.3% to a majority of 57.3%, reflecting a maturing populace.


Conversely, Italy's 2000 statistics portray a relatively mature population, with the 60+ category accounting for nearly a quarter of its populace. Fast forward to 2050, and this segment is expected to nearly double to 42.3%, indicating a pronounced aging trend. The youngest cohort (0-14 years) is anticipated to shrink slightly to 11.5%, while the middle age bracket (15-59 years) is predicted to experience a more pronounced decline, dropping to 46.2%.



Sample Answer 5

The illustration delineates the demographic composition delineating the ages of the populations of Yemen and Italy at the turn of the millennium and anticipates their distribution by the mid-21st century.


An overview of the data presents a notable demographic shift. The segment of 15-59 year-olds is set to expand in Yemen while contracting in Italy. Conversely, the elderly population (60+ years) is projected to burgeon in Italy and experience a marginal increase in Yemen. The cohort of individuals aged 0-14 years is forecasted to shrink in both nations.


Delving into specifics, Yemen's middle-aged bracket, constituting individuals aged 15-59, is expected to rise from 46.3% to 57.3%. This contrasts with Italy, where a significant reduction from 61.6% to 46.2% is anticipated. In Yemen, this age group remains the majority in both time frames, signifying a youthful demographic with potential implications for the labor force and economic vitality.


Turning to the senior population, Italy is poised for a pronounced upsurge from 24.1% to 42.3%, suggesting a rapidly aging society with potential challenges for healthcare and pensions. Yemen's elderly demographic exhibits a slight increase of approximately 2%, reflecting a relatively younger population structure. The youngest age group, those under 14, is anticipated to decrease in both countries, descending from 50.1% to 37% in Yemen and from 14.3% to 11.5% in Italy, indicative of declining birth rates and evolving family size norms.


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