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UK Graduate and Postgraduate Students Not into Full-time Work - Task 1 Multiple Graphs Band 9 Sample

Updated: Jun 28

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The charts below show what UK graduate and postgraduate students who did not go into full-time work did after leaving college in 2008.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.


Task 1 Multiple Graphs Band 9 Sample (UK Graduates and Postgraduates)

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Sample Report 1

The presented bar charts depict the subsequent pathways taken by UK graduate and postgraduate students in the year 2008, excluding those who embarked on full-time work.


It can be observed that further study was the most prevalent choice of destination for both graduate and postgraduate students, while voluntary work was the least favoured.


The number of graduates who pursued further study soared to almost 30,000, which was significantly higher than those who engaged in other pursuits. Conversely, a meagre 3500 graduates chose voluntary work, rendering it the most uncommon post-university destination. Part-time work and unemployment held a similar number of graduates, with 17,735 and 16,235 respectively.


Likewise, for postgraduates, the largest and smallest groups, respectively, were those who went on to further study, with 2,725 students, and those who opted for voluntary work, with only 345 students. However, a considerable number of postgraduates engaged in part-time work, with 2,535 students, as opposed to unemployment, with only 1,625 students.


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Sample Report 2

The bar charts represent the situation of graduates and postgraduates in the UK who did not opt for full-time employment after completing their studies in 2008.


Overall, the students in the UK who did not choose full-time employment opted to either continue their academic journey or work part-time, while a significant number remained unemployed. Voluntary work was the least preferred choice among the student groups.


Notably, a significant number of students chose to pursue further education, marking it as the most popular option. Nearly 30,000 graduates continued their academic journey, while 2,725 postgraduates did the same. The second most opted for choice was part-time employment, which constituted 17,735 graduates and 2,535 postgraduates. Meanwhile, a substantial number of students remained unemployed, with 16,235 graduates and 1,625 postgraduates struggling to find work.


The least chosen option among the four groups was voluntary work. Only 3,500 graduates and 345 postgraduates ventured into this field. Thus, the trend suggests that pursuing further education was the preferred choice, whereas voluntary work was the least favoured.


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Sample Report 3

The bar graphs depict the situation of graduate and postgraduate students who have not found full-time employment after finishing their studies in 2008.


Most graduate and postgraduate students who chose not to work full-time did so later on and continued their education. However, the student groups for part-time job and unemployment consistently ranked second and third, respectively, and were followed by the group for volunteer work.


After graduating in 2008, about 30,000 students continued their education. This is the largest share among the four student groups that did not start working full-time after graduating during this time. Part-time employment and unemployed category tied for second place with 17,735 and 16,235 students, respectively. Only 3,500 grads, the lowest percentage of pupils, began volunteer work after graduating.


Similar to this, the majority of students (2,725) who completed their master’s degrees in 2008 but did not start working full-time continued their academic pursuits. The group that started part-time employment was closely behind it, though with only a 200-student margin. With 1,625 students, the group of unemployed postgraduates came in third, followed by volunteer work.



Sample Report 4

The bar charts present data on the activities pursued by UK graduates and postgraduates, excluding those who took up full-time work, upon completing their college education in 2008. Overall, there were marked similarities in the post-graduation pursuits of both categories of students.


Upon examination of the charts, the majority of graduates chose to pursue further studies, with a sizeable figure of 29,665 recorded. In contrast, only 2,725 postgraduates pursued higher education. Furthermore, a significant proportion of graduates, around 17,735, took up part-time employment while just 2,535 postgraduates did so.


In addition, it is noteworthy that very few students from either group chose voluntary work as a post-graduation option. Only 3,500 graduates opted for such work, while the corresponding figure for postgraduates was a mere 345. Also, a considerable number of graduates and postgraduates remained unemployed, with a total of 17,860 candidates being recorded as unemployed. Of these, 16,235 were undergraduate students and the rest were postgraduates.



Sample Report 5

The presented bar charts provide a comprehensive picture of the destinations that graduates and postgraduates from the UK pursued in 2008 after their college education, excluding those who commenced full-time employment.


A cursory glance at the data reveals that both groups shared a parallel path in terms of their post-college engagements.


It is evident that a majority of graduates, numbering 29,665, and postgraduates, numbering 2,725, chose to pursue further studies. The next significant destination for graduates was part-time employment, with 17,735 individuals opting for this route, which was significantly higher than the postgraduates' number, standing at 2,535.


Furthermore, voluntary work emerged as the least favoured option among the graduates and postgraduates. Only 3,500 graduates and 345 postgraduates chose to take up voluntary services. Finally, the number of individuals who remained unemployed was significantly high, with 16,235 graduates and 1,625 postgraduates, forming the group who did not pursue further studies or take up part-time employment.


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