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Waste Recycling Rates in The U.S. From 1960 to 2011 - Task 1 Line Graph Sample

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graph below shows waste recycling rates in the U.S. from 1960 to 2011.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.


Waste Recycling Rates in The U.S. From 1960 to 2011 - Task 1 Line Graph Sample

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Model Answer 1 (Band 9)

The provided graph offers a snapshot of the progression in waste recycling rates in the U.S. from the year 1960 through 2011, delineating a clear trend in both the total waste recovery in million tons and the percentage of waste that was recycled.


An overview of the data indicates a modest commencement in the 1960s, followed by a striking growth post-1985 in both the waste recovery and recycling rates. It's noteworthy that while improvements are evident, a significant volume of waste did not undergo the recycling process.


Delving into specifics, in 1960, the U.S. saw 5.6 million tons of waste recovery with a recycling rate of only 6.4%. Over the next decade, recovery amounts gently rose to 8 million tons, with a minor uptick in recycling to 6.6%. By 1980, the recovery had surged to 14.5 million tons, with nearly a tenth being recycled. The subsequent five years marked a slight increase in the recycling rate to almost 10%.


The trend over the next quarter-century showcases a robust upsurge. By 1995, recycling rates had improved to 16%, and by 2005, an impressive leap to nearly one-third of waste was recycled out of the 79.8 million tons recovered. In 2011, the culmination of this upward trend was evident when over one-third of waste, approximately 30 million tons, was recycled from a total recovery of 86.9 million tons, highlighting a persistent gap wherein a substantial portion of waste remained non-recycled.


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Model Answer 2 (Band 9)

The line graph elucidates the trends in waste recovery and recycling in the United States over a half-century span, from 1960 to 2011, quantified in million tons and percentage terms, respectively.


An overarching glance at the chart reveals two distinct trends: a gradual increase in the total volume of waste recovery and a more pronounced rise in the percentage of recycling from the mid-1980s onwards. It is apparent that, despite the growth in recycling, a considerable amount of waste did not undergo this process.


In the initial decade recorded, the recovery of waste was 5.6 million tons, with recycling rates at a nascent 6.4%. The subsequent decade exhibited a slight increment, with 8 million tons of waste recovered and a marginal rise in recycling to 6.6%. By 1980, the figures had more than doubled to 14.5 million tons of waste recovery, with the recycling rate creeping up to just shy of 10%. The following five years witnessed a modest improvement in recycling, touching nearly 10%.


The ensuing years up to 2005 signify a marked enhancement in recycling efforts, with rates soaring to approximately one-third of the 79.8 million tons of waste recovered. This trend peaks in 2011, showcasing that over one-third of the waste, translating to around 30 million tons, was recycled from a total recovery of 86.9 million tons, thereby underscoring the persistent issue of unrecycled waste.


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Model Answer 3 (Band 9)

The chart provides an analysis of the evolution of waste recycling rates in the U.S. from 1960 to 2011, detailing the volume of waste recovered in million tons and the corresponding percentages of recycled material.


Initially, the graph indicates a modest commencement in waste recovery and recycling efforts in the early years, with a significant escalation observable post-mid-1980s. It's evident that while the recycling rates have improved over time, not all waste was subjected to the recycling process.


In the onset year of 1960, the U.S. achieved a waste recovery of 5.6 million tons with a recycling rate at a minimal 6.4%. Progressing through the decades, there was a slight increase in 1970 to 8 million tons recovered and a 6.6% recycling rate. By the advent of the 1980s, a noteworthy jump to 14.5 million tons in waste recovery was recorded, with the recycling rate nearing 10%. A further inspection of the mid-1980s reveals an incremental rise in recycling rates to just under 10%.


The period leading up to 2005 is marked by significant strides in recycling, as evidenced by the sharp rise to a recycling rate of one-third of the nearly 80 million tons of waste recovered. By 2011, the trend reached its zenith with over one-third of waste, equating to around 30 million tons, being recycled from a total of 86.9 million tons recovered, highlighting the fact that a substantial volume of waste remained untreated by recycling processes.


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