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Water Use Worldwide and Water Consumption in Two Countries....(Task 1 Multiple Graphs Band 9 Sample)

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graph and table below give information about water use worldwide and water consumption in two different countries.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.


Water Use Worldwide and Water Consumption in Two Countries....(Task 1 Multiple Graphs Band 9 Sample)

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Model Answer 1

The table compares water consumption between Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo for the year 2000, while the graph presents information about water usage in agriculture, industry, and domestic use between 1990 and 2000.


Overall, all three of these sectors have seen a considerable growth in the worldwide use of water since the middle of the 20th century. During the period in question, Brazil's water usage was noticeably higher than that of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).


Water consumption for agriculture was 500 km3 per year in 1900, but since 1940, it kept dramatically increasing which peaked in 2000 at over 3000 km3. However, up until 1950, when a considerable growth began, industrial and home water usage had a lacklustre performance. These industries (agricultural and industry) have had a slight rise in water usage since 1950. Even while industrial usage has always outpaced home consumption, it remained significantly lower than the level of use in the agriculture sector.


On the other hand, while having only roughly one third population of DRC, Brazil consumed 26,500 km2 of water in 2000 while DRC used only 100 km2. As a result, in 2000, Brazil's per-person water consumption was more than 40 times higher than that of the DRC.


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Model Answer 2

The table furnishes a comparative analysis of water consumption patterns in Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) for the year 2000, while the graph elucidates the sectorial water usage delineating agriculture, industry, and domestic consumption from 1990 to 2000.


A remarkable global upsurge in water usage across the aforementioned sectors is evident since the mid-20th century. During the scrutinised duration, Brazil's consumption patterns significantly overshadowed the DRC's.


Agricultural water consumption, standing at a mere 500 km3 per annum in 1900, witnessed a dramatic escalation post-1940, culminating in 2000 at an exorbitant 3000 km3. In stark contrast, up until 1950, industrial and domestic water usage reflected an unimpressive trend. These sectors initiated a modest upturn in their water consumption post-1950. Despite industry consistently exceeding domestic use, it trailed significantly behind the agricultural sector.


Contrastingly, Brazil, despite having roughly a third of the DRC's population, manifested a staggering consumption of 26,500 km2 of water in 2000, dwarfing DRC's meagre 100 km2. Consequently, Brazil's per capita water consumption in 2000 was a whopping 40 times that of the DRC.


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Model Answer 3

The line graph and accompanying table provide insight into the patterns of water use globally over the last century, as well as comparing the specific water consumption metrics in Brazil and the Democratic Republic of Congo as of the year 2000.


The overarching trend depicted by the graph is a significant rise in global water usage across three key sectors: agriculture, industry, and domestic needs. Agriculture has consistently been the dominant consumer, with its water use escalating from approximately 500 cubic kilometers in 1900 to an estimated 3,000 cubic kilometers by the turn of the millennium. Industrial water use, initially modest, began to climb around 1950, reaching just above 1,000 cubic kilometers, while domestic consumption experienced a more gradual increase to about 300 cubic kilometers.


In stark contrast, the table presents a detailed snapshot of water use in Brazil and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Brazil's extensive irrigation for agriculture covers 26,500 square kilometers, which dwarfs the Democratic Republic of Congo's 100 square kilometers. The impact of this agricultural activity is reflected in the per capita water consumption figures: a Brazilian uses 359 cubic meters of water, vastly outstripping the 8 cubic meters used by a Congolese individual. When these figures are contextualized against Brazil's large population of 176 million, the scale of water used for agriculture becomes even more pronounced.


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Model Answer 4

The provided illustrative data delineates the trajectory of water use worldwide over a century and delineates consumption in two distinct nations.


An examination of the graph reveals a stark upward trajectory in global water use, segmented into agricultural, industrial, and domestic categories. Agriculture claims the lion's share, with its consumption skyrocketing from a meager 500 cubic kilometers in the early 1900s to a staggering 3,000 cubic kilometers by the year 2000. Meanwhile, industrial and domestic sectors also demonstrated an uptick in water use worldwide, with industrial water consumption ascending to just over 1,000 cubic kilometers, and domestic use, though increasing more modestly, reaching 300 cubic kilometers by the century's end.


The accompanying table provides a comparative lens on water use in Brazil versus the Democratic Republic of Congo. The sheer scale of Brazil's irrigation—an expansive 26,500 square kilometers—contrasts sharply with the Democratic Republic of Congo's modest 100 square kilometers. This discrepancy is further evidenced in per capita water consumption figures: an average Brazilian's water footprint is 359 cubic meters, a stark contrast to the 8 cubic meters for a Congolese counterpart. With Brazil's robust population of 176 million, the data illustrates the profound impact of agricultural practices on water use worldwide and individual water consumption.


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