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Average Consumption of Food in the World in 2008 Compared to China and India

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The pie charts show the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 compared to two countries; China and India.

Write a report to a university lecturer describing the data.


Write at least 150 words.

Average Consumption of Food in the World in 2008 Compared to China and India

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Model Answer 1

The pie charts provide a comparison of the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 with the consumptive patterns in China and India during the same period.


In 2008, the average consumption of food in the world was predominantly characterized by processed foods, comprising 41% of the global diet. This figure was comparable to India’s reliance on processed sustenance, which stood at 39%. However, the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 differed from China, where processed items constituted a lesser share of 34%.


The average consumption of food in the world in 2008 for vegetables and fruits was less prominent, accounting for just under 30%, yet this was not the case in China. There, vegetables and fruits formed a significant portion of the diet, at 32%. India lagged behind in this category with 23%. Notably, the intake of nuts and seeds in China outstripped the average consumption of food in the world in 2008, representing 19% compared to the global 4%. Similarly, India's consumption of nuts and seeds was higher than the global average at 11%.


Animal-based foods presented an interesting contrast; while the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 from this category was 26%, India exceeded this with a substantial 27%. China’s consumption was markedly lower at 15%. These distinctions highlight diverse dietary preferences and the variance in the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 when segmented by region.


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Model Answer 2

The pie charts delineate the dietary preferences globally in 2008, juxtaposed with those of China and India, shedding light on the average consumption of food in these regions.


At the forefront, the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 was led by processed food, which was also a substantial part of India's diet, albeit slightly less dominant. Contrastingly, China's average consumption of food in 2008 saw a reduced proportion of processed food. Vegetables and fruits also showed significant disparities between the global average and the individual consumption rates of China and India, as did the intake of nuts and seeds, with China’s figures surpassing the global average consumption of food in the world in 2008.


Delving deeper, the global palate in 2008 favored processed food, with 41% of the diet comprising such items. The average consumption of food in the world in 2008 for vegetables and fruits stood at 29%, a stark difference from China's 32% but higher than India's 23%. The penchant for nuts and seeds was markedly higher in China, accounting for 19% of the diet, over four times the average consumption of food in the world in 2008, while India also consumed a higher-than-global-average at 11%.


Regarding animal food, the Indian diet slightly outpaced the global average consumption of food in the world in 2008 by 1%, suggesting a parity with the world's preference. China, on the other hand, demonstrated a contrasting trend, with only 15% of its diet from animal sources, underscoring a divergent dietary pattern from both the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 and India's animal food intake. These variations underscore the distinctive dietary compositions and the average consumption of food in the world in 2008.


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Model Answer 3

The pie charts elucidate the proportionate consumption of different food categories in the world and in the nations of China and India for the year 2008, thereby offering insights into the average consumption of food in the world in 2008.


Observing the data holistically, it is evident that processed food commanded a major segment of the average consumption of food in the world in 2008, while China and India demonstrated a pronounced predilection for nuts and seeds beyond the global norm. The intake of vegetables and fruits, as well as animal-derived foods, also exhibited notable variations between the global average and the individual consumption patterns of the two Asian giants.


The global average consumption of food in the world in 2008 was significantly swayed towards processed food, which formed 41% of the dietary intake. This penchant for processed food was closely mirrored in India, at 39%, but China deviated from this trend, showing a lesser inclination at 34%. Vegetables and fruits comprised nearly a third of China’s dietary consumption at 32%, surpassing the world’s average of 29% and India’s 23%. The consumption of nuts and seeds was strikingly higher in China, representing 19% of the dietary intake, a figure that quintuples the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 and almost doubles that of India’s 11%.


The reliance on animal-based foods in India was marginally higher than the average consumption of food in the world in 2008, with a 27% share, reflecting a similarity in dietary habits. In stark contrast, China’s average consumption of such foods was considerably lower at 15%, indicating a distinct dietary preference that diverges notably from the average consumption of food in the world in 2008 and India’s consumption patterns. This data accentuates the diversity in dietary choices among the global and national populations in the year 2008.


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