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Changes in the Maximum Number of Asian Elephants Between 1994 and 2007 - Task 1 Bar Graph

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graph below shows the changes in the maximum number of Asian elephants between 1994 and 2007.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.

Changes in the Maximum Number of Asian Elephants Between 1994 and 2007 - Task 1 Bar Graph

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Model Answer 1

The chart illustrates the shifts in the peak populations of Asian elephants across various countries between the years 1997 and 2004. In a notable trend, both India and Myanmar, which initially had the largest populations, saw a decline in their elephant numbers over the seven-year span.


A striking observation from the data is that, in 1997, India was home to around 10,000 elephants, representing the zenith across the surveyed nations. Myanmar followed, standing as the second major habitat for this species. Meanwhile, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and China each reported populations close to 1,000 elephants. Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand were host to about 3,000 elephants each, and China had the smallest population, with a mere count of elephants.


By 2004, the elephant counts had diminished in all the countries except for Laos, which witnessed an upturn. India’s numbers dropped to approximately 7,500, Myanmar saw a reduction to 4,800, and Thailand's count fell to about 1,200. Conversely, Cambodia experienced a rise in its elephant population. Alarmingly, China's count plummeted to under 500, signaling a critical situation for the preservation of the species within its borders.


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Model Answer 2

The provided bar chart elucidates the estimated peak populations of Asian elephants in various Asian territories, contrasting figures from the years 1997 and 2004.


The overview of this chart underscores a prevalent downturn in elephant populations across the examined regions, with the sole exception being Cambodia, where there was an ascension in numbers. India, despite the general decline, remained at the forefront with the most substantial elephant population.


Detailing the specifics, the data reveals that China's elephant numbers halved during the period, underscoring the severity of the changes in the maximum number of Asian elephants. Meanwhile, India's counts, although still the highest, suffered a sharp decrease, reflecting the overarching trend of reduction. Malaysia's figures were particularly alarming, where the population descended precipitously to a mere thousand, marking one of the most significant declines in the maximum number of Asian elephants.


In contrast, Cambodia offered a beacon of hope, with an increase of 200 elephants, highlighting a positive deviation from the overall pattern. Vietnam and Laos maintained their numbers, each just above the thousand mark, illustrating a plateau amidst a narrative of decline.


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Model Answer 3

The graph delineates the fluctuations in the maximal recorded populations of Asian elephants within a selection of countries, comparing figures from 1997 to those of 2004. It reveals a discernible downward trend in these numbers, with notable exceptions.


Commencing with an overarching glance, the most salient feature is the pronounced decrease in elephant populations across almost all listed nations, save for Laos, which registered an increase. The initial data points indicated India as the preeminent sanctuary for these majestic creatures, followed by Myanmar, with other countries trailing at varying lower levels.


Delving into the specifics, India's elephant population, which stood at a remarkable high of roughly 10,000 in 1997, witnessed a reduction by a quarter to 7,500 in 2004. Myanmar, the secondary refuge, also saw its numbers dwindle from near 5,000 to 4,800 within the same period. A similar trend was observed in Thailand, where the population experienced a dip to a mere 1,200. Contrastingly, the number of elephants in Laos experienced a rise, a unique occurrence amongst the data. The situation in China was particularly dire, with the elephant populace diminishing to an alarming figure of less than 500, highlighting critical concerns for conservation.


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Model Answer 4

The bar chart presents a comparison of the estimated maximum populations of Asian elephants across nine countries, charting the changes between 1997 and 2004.


Overall, the data illustrates a general decline in elephant populations across the majority of surveyed nations, with India's figures being notably the highest. Conversely, Cambodia offers a glimmer of hope with an uptick in its elephant count.


Closer scrutiny reveals a stark halving of elephant numbers in China, from one thousand to a mere five hundred. India, while maintaining its lead, witnessed a substantial reduction in its elephant populace. Malaysia's situation is particularly alarming, with its elephant population plunging to a mere thousand, a significant decrease from its earlier count. In stark contrast, Cambodia's conservation efforts are evidently bearing fruit, showcasing an increase of two hundred elephants.


The trajectory in Laos and Vietnam appears relatively stable, hovering around the thousand mark, seemingly resistant to the downward trend observed elsewhere. Thailand and Myanmar, however, are not spared, with their numbers dwindling by more than fifty percent.

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Model Answer 5

The illustrative bar graph delineates the fluctuations in the maximal counts of Asian elephants within a selection of nine Asian countries over the span from 1997 to 2004.


From an overarching perspective, it is evident that the interval under scrutiny saw a prevalent decline in elephant populations, with the exception of Cambodia, where there was a notable increment. India's elephant numbers remained unrivaled, despite a discernible descent in their quantities.


A deeper analysis reveals that China's elephant population was halved over the seven-year period, a poignant reflection of the broader trend. India, despite its significant loss, sustained its position as the predominant habitat for these majestic creatures. The dip in Malaysia's numbers is particularly concerning, plummeting to a low of a thousand, down from much higher figures previously recorded. Cambodia stands as a laudable outlier with an increase of 200 elephants, suggesting effective conservation measures.


Vietnam and Laos exhibit a comparative stasis in their elephant populations, each maintaining just above a thousand individuals, a rarity in the context of the general downward pattern. Thailand and Myanmar's elephant numbers experienced a precipitous decline, echoing the concerning changes in the maximum number of Asian elephants seen region-wide.



Model Answer 6

The bar graph in question meticulously compares the estimated upper limits of the Asian elephant populations across a suite of nine countries, documenting the alterations between the years 1997 and 2004.


In a sweeping overview, it becomes clear that there was a pervasive shrinkage in the numbers of this species, with the stark exception of Cambodia where a rise was recorded. The figures for India, although still topping the chart, exhibit a considerable contraction.


Diving into the specifics, China's elephant population witnessed a drastic cutback, dwindling down to half of its former glory. In sharp contrast, India, although retaining its status as the bastion of the largest elephant population, could not escape the downward spiral, shedding a significant portion of its pachyderm populace. On the Malaysian front, the decline was alarming, with the numbers taking a steep dive to a mere thousand, starkly underscoring the changes in the maximum number of Asian elephants. Against this backdrop of general decline, Cambodia's elephant community stands out with a population swell by an additional 200.


The scenarios in Vietnam and Laos present a different narrative with their elephant counts hovering consistently around the thousand mark, an anomaly in an otherwise declining trend.


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