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When designing a building, the most important factor is the intended use of....(Band 9 Sample Essay)

Updated: Mar 14

You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.


Write about the following topic:


When designing a building, the most important factor is the intended use of the building rather than its outward appearance.

To what extent do you agree or disagree?


Give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your own knowledge and experiences.


You should write at least 250 words.


IELTS Task 2 Band 9 Sample Essay - When designing a building, the most important factor is the intended use of the building rather than its outward appearance.

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Sample Essay 1

It is believed that the exterior appearance of the building is of less importance compared to its original use. I strongly agree with this statement because it is more of an output-oriented view, facilitating efficient service and economic development.


Prioritization of the intended use over appearance brings more value benefits to the users of the building because they can start exploiting it purposefully from the very beginning. Moreover, it is a win-win approach as it favours not only the people working in the building, but also the government, if it requested the construction. For instance, doctors can definitely start working in public hospitals and concentrate on helping or even saving people’s lives, even if the outward is rudimentary or even incomplete, since inward facilities are more vital for them. Furthermore, it is obvious that everybody benefits in this case. Patients receive the needed care; doctors have paid jobs and the government collects taxes on doctors’ salaries and VAT from the provided medical care. I believe that all these factors make such an approach advantageous.


In addition, if main emphasis is put solely on the interior, it helps bring the most out of it. Industrial areas can be a good example of this. Factories and administrative buildings with repetitive and plain outward design can successfully operate, though they might not look inspiring and breath-taking. In other words, when a factory focuses on its outer appearance, it might hamper its proper internal setup, because the production mechanism depends on how efficiently the machineries and manufacturing process function, not how they look like. That means, the buildings can appear less attractive, more grey and even soulless at some point, but still, they can add incredible value to the economy. Therefore, such establishments might be considered captivating neither for local residents nor for tourists; but still, because of their output and employment generation, they are the economic engines for the respective nations.


To conclude, this essay reasserts that the intended use of the building is of high importance in design, because it yields benefits for all the stakeholders by providing efficient workplace environment and overall national economic growth.


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Sample Essay 2

In the realm of architecture, the debate between form and function is perennial. This essay posits that while aesthetic appeal holds its value, the practical utility of a building is paramount. The ensuing discussion will delve into the primacy of purposeful design over aesthetic considerations, followed by an exploration of how functionality ensures sustainability and user satisfaction.


Central to the argument is the notion that a building’s utility should be its cornerstone. Architectural marvels across the globe, from the pragmatic simplicity of Scandinavian design to the intricate functionality of ancient aqueducts, underscore this principle. For instance, educational institutions designed with ample natural lighting and acoustic considerations significantly enhance learning outcomes. This emphasis on utility does not diminish aesthetics but rather integrates them within a framework that serves the building's primary function. Hence, the utilitarian approach to design does not preclude beauty but ensures that it is not the sole focus.


Furthermore, functionality is inextricably linked to sustainability and occupant satisfaction. A building that is energy-efficient, leveraging natural resources like sunlight and wind, not only reduces operational costs but also contributes to environmental preservation. The Edge in Amsterdam, heralded as the greenest building in the world, exemplifies this harmony between functionality and sustainability, boasting a design that optimizes energy use while providing a stimulating work environment. Such examples illustrate that a building's design, rooted in its intended use, achieves a sustainable balance between form and function, ensuring long-term satisfaction for its users.


In conclusion, while the aesthetic appeal of a building can enhance its character, the essence of architectural excellence lies in its functionality. Buildings designed with a focus on their intended use, sustainability, and occupant satisfaction stand as testaments to the wisdom of prioritizing function over form. This approach not only meets the immediate needs of its users but also addresses broader environmental concerns, marking the true hallmark of architectural success.


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Sample Essay 3

The architectural discourse often oscillates between the visual aesthetics of a structure and its intended functionality. This essay advocates for the primacy of a building's purpose over its external appearance, arguing that the true value of architecture lies in its ability to serve the needs of its users efficiently. The subsequent analysis will focus on how prioritizing functional design enhances the utility and longevity of buildings, and the interplay between purposeful architecture and environmental sustainability.


At the heart of this debate is the conviction that a building must first and foremost fulfill its intended function. Historical and contemporary architectural practices provide ample evidence that prioritizing function does not preclude aesthetic excellence but rather complements it. For example, the design of hospitals prioritizes hygiene, accessibility, and patient comfort, factors that directly impact health outcomes. Similarly, the innovative use of space and natural materials in residential buildings can significantly improve the quality of life for its inhabitants. These examples illustrate that an emphasis on functionality can lead to innovative design solutions that are both practical and visually appealing.


Moreover, the significance of functional design extends beyond immediate utility to encompass environmental sustainability and adaptability. Buildings designed with a focus on energy efficiency, such as the use of passive solar design or green roofs, not only reduce operational costs but also minimize their ecological footprint. The Crystal in London serves as a paragon of sustainable design, combining cutting-edge technology with efficient use of resources to create a building that is both functional and environmentally friendly. This holistic approach to architecture ensures that buildings can adapt to changing needs over time, thereby extending their usefulness and mitigating the need for costly renovations or replacements.


In conclusion, while the aesthetic appearance of a building contributes to its character, the essence of architectural excellence lies in its functionality. Prioritizing the intended use of a building ensures that it meets the needs of its users, promotes environmental sustainability, and stands the test of time. This pragmatic approach to architecture underscores the importance of designing spaces that are not only visually striking but also profoundly functional and adaptable.


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