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Number of Men and Women in Further Education in Britain for Full-time or Part-time (IELTS Task 1)

Updated: Jun 28

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The chart below shows the number of men and women (in thousand) in further education in Britain in three periods and whether they were studying full-time or part-time.


Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


Write at least 150 words.


This is an IELTS Task-1 Bar Graph Band 9 Sample Report based on the question prompt "The chart below shows the number of men and women (in thousand) in further education in Britain in three periods and whether they were studying full-time or part-time." - ieltsluminary.com

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Model Answer 1

The bar chart delineates the trends in the number of men and women in further education in Britain over three distinct time frames, highlighting the distribution between full-time and part-time educational pursuits.


In an overarching view, the chart unfolds a compelling narrative: the number of men and women in further education in Britain embracing part-time studies showcased a steady incline throughout the periods in question. This rise in part-time education starkly contrasts with the full-time education pattern, which experienced a gender-based divergence — a decline for men and a pronounced increase for women.


The initial period reveals that nearly 1,000,000 men were enrolled in full-time education, significantly outnumbering women, who accounted for approximately 700,000. As we progressed through the decades, a downward tilt in the number of men in further education in Britain opting for full-time studies became evident, ultimately settling just above the 800,000 mark before a modest recovery. Concurrently, women in full-time education embarked on an upward trajectory, eventually eclipsing their male counterparts, reaching a zenith of about 1,100,000 by the final period.


Part-time education contours emerged differently. Commencing at a lower echelon, with women starting at around 100,000, the subsequent years witnessed a remarkable ascendancy, with the number of men and women in further education in Britain choosing part-time studies nearly converging by 1980-81. The crescendo of this trend was a near parity by 1990-91, with both genders at the threshold of 220,000, encapsulating the evolving landscape of further education in Britain.


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Model Answer 2

The provided illustration delineates the progression in the number of men and women engaged in further education within Britain, detailing their participation in either full-time or part-time programs over three pivotal academic intervals: 1970/71, 1980/81, and 1990/91.


A cursory glance at the data reveals two overarching trends: the consistent expansion in part-time education enrolment across genders and a divergence in full-time education, where a male decline contrasts with a female upsurge. Notably, the quantity of women in full-time education eventually eclipsed that of their male counterparts.


Delving into the intricacies of full-time education, we discern that initially, the number of men in further education in Britain stood at a towering 1,000,000 in the 1970/71 period, a figure that notably overshadowed the roughly 700,000 women. The subsequent decade witnessed a precipitous decline in male enrolment to just above 800,000, followed by a modest recuperation to approximately 850,000 by 1990/91. In contrast, the number of women in further education in Britain on a full-time basis exhibited a steadfast increase, culminating in an unprecedented peak of around 1,100,000 by the final period measured.


Part-time education's narrative is characterized by a gradual upswing for both sexes. Commencing with a base figure in the vicinity of 100,000 women in 1970, this segment saw women surpassing men during 1980/81 with a count nearing 200,000. By the era of 1990/91, a convergence occurs, with the number of men and women in further education in Britain, via part-time studies, each hovering around the 220,000 mark, underscoring a notable parity between the two.


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Model Answer 3

The bar chart presents the evolution of individuals pursuing further education in Britain, whether part-time or full-time, during three distinct academic periods from 1970 to 1991.


Overall, both genders pursuing part-time education revealed a constant upward trajectory. Conversely, full-time education trends depicted an intriguing reversal: a steady decrease among men countered by a significant surge for women.


Focusing on male full-time students, the numbers in 1970 and 1971 approximated 1 million, a figure markedly greater than their female counterparts, recorded at roughly 700,000. In subsequent years, the male enrolment observed a distinct downward shift, bottoming out just above 800,000, before slightly rebounding to nearly 850,000 by the end of the period. Female students, on the other hand, exhibited consistent growth, culminating in surpassing the men with a peak at around 1.1 million by the end of the period.


Transitioning to part-time education, both genders demonstrated an escalating trend, albeit women initiated from a lower base of approximately 100,000 in 1970. Despite this, women managed to overtake the men by 1980 and 1981, with enrolment nearing 200,000. Remarkably, in the concluding years (1990–1991), the number of part-time students of both sexes levelled off, with each standing at almost 220,000.



Model Answer 4

The bar chart lucidly portrays the demographic evolution of individuals, irrespective of their sex, embarking on tertiary education in a part-time or full-time capacity in the United Kingdom across three distinct academic years, spanning from 1970 to 1991.


Overall, there was an unswerving upsurge in the volume of individuals of both sexes pursuing part-time education. However, the progression of full-time education demographics presented a fascinating dichotomy: while the male student body experienced a notable contraction, the female populace exhibited a significant amplification.


Exploring full-time education, the male student contingent during 1970 and 1971 amounted to a substantial figure of approximately 1 million, markedly surpassing the female count of approximately 700 thousand. This period was followed by a conspicuous downturn in the male demographic, dwindling to slightly above 800 thousand, before a modest ascension to approximately 850 thousand during the terminal years. Conversely, the female cohort pursued a relentless upward trajectory throughout the third academic period. Ultimately, they outpaced their male peers, achieving a zenith of roughly 1,100,000.


Delving into part-time studies, both sexes manifested an ascendant trend, albeit women started from a lower baseline in the academic year of 1970, with a figure around 100,000. Despite this initial disparity, they managed to supersede the male count in 1980 and 1981 by registering a number close to 200 thousand. In the subsequent period (1990–1991), the figures for both sexes converged, plateauing at an identical point of approximately 220 thousand.



Model Answer 5

The bar graph articulately illustrates the count of individuals, irrespective of their sex, who pursued either part-time or full-time further education in the United Kingdom across three distinct academic periods, spanning from 1970 to 1991.


In general, part-time education saw a consistent growth in enrolment from both sexes. However, the pattern for full-time education diverged: a noticeable decline in male students was counterbalanced by a significant rise in the number of women.


In terms of full-time education, the male student body in 1970 and 1971 was approximately 1 million, significantly overshadowing the female figure of about 700 thousand. Subsequent years saw a sharp downward turn for the males, dropping to just over 800 thousand, before experiencing a slight increase to near 850 thousand in the concluding years. On the other hand, the female cohort displayed an unwavering upward trend throughout the third educational period. Ultimately, they outstripped the male demographic by reaching an apex of approximately 1,100,000.


Regarding part-time studies, an escalating pattern was observed among both genders, albeit women began from a lower initial count around 100,000 in 1970. However, they managed to overtake male enrolment figures in 1980 and 1981, attaining close to 200 thousand. In the concluding period (1990-1991), the numbers for both sexes converged, each approximating 220 thousand.



Model Answer 6

The bar chart offers a comparative overview of the number of men and women engaged in further education in Britain across three distinct timeframes, distinguishing between full-time and part-time study commitments.


The most striking trend is the significant prevalence of full-time education over part-time across both genders. Additionally, a noteworthy shift is observed in the increasing participation of women in both modes of education, surpassing men by the final period.


Delving into specifics, the initial period shows approximately 1000 thousand men pursuing full-time education, a figure that slightly declines in the subsequent decades. In contrast, the count of males enrolled part-time exhibits a twofold increase from 100 to 200 thousand over the same span. For women, the progression is even more pronounced; the full-time education tally begins at 700 thousand and escalates dramatically to 1100 thousand by 1990/91, indicating a heightened educational engagement. Part-time figures for females also rise sharply, from a modest 20 thousand to over 200 thousand, reflecting a tenfold growth.


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