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Levels of Participation in Education and Science in Developing and Industrialised Countries - Task 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The charts below show the levels of participation in education and science in developing and industrialised countries in 1980 and 1990.


Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below.


Write at least 150 words.

Levels of Participation in Education and Science in Developing and Industrialised Countries - Task 1 Band 9 Sample Report

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Model Answer 1

The graphical representations provided articulate the engagement levels in academic and scientific fields within developing and industrialised nations across the decade spanning 1980 to 1990.


Commencing with a panoramic view, one can observe a discernible gulf in the average duration of schooling and the density of scientific professionals between the two categories of nations. This chasm is further pronounced when examining fiscal dedication towards research and development. The industrialised countries clearly lead with their superior numbers in all aspects over the ten-year period.


Delving deeper into educational participation, in 1980, developing countries exhibited an average schooling span barely exceeding two years, whereas industrialised countries presented an average nearing nine years. The decade saw these figures ascend modestly to over three years for the former and cross the ten-year threshold for the latter, indicating an incremental yet unequal growth in educational participation in education and science in developing and industrialised countries.


With regards to scientific manpower, the 1980s recorded fewer than 20 scientists and technicians per thousand people in the developing nations, a stark contrast to the approximate 50 per thousand in their industrialised counterparts. By 1990, the participation in education and science in developing and industrialised countries manifested through these numbers saw little change for the developing regions, while the industrialised countries showcased a substantial rise, reinforcing the imbalance.


Investments in research and development mirrored this disparity. Developing countries' spending, which stood at around 50 billion USD in 1980, plummeted by half over the next decade. Meanwhile, industrialised countries not only maintained their lead but also escalated their spending from 150 to an impressive 300 billion USD.


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Model Answer 2

The provided visual data meticulously delineates the disparity in participation in education and science between developing and industrialised nations, as measured over the decade between 1980 and 1990.


At the crux of the overview is the striking divergence in educational duration and scientific workforce between the two sets of countries. Initially, the gap in average schooling years stood pronounced, with a modest increment in developing nations from roughly 2 to just over 3 years, in stark contrast to the leap from 8 to over 10 years in their industrialised counterparts. Parallel to this, the prevalence of scientists and technicians per 1,000 individuals showcased a stark imbalance, with the developing world's percentage lingering below the 20% mark, while industrialised nations saw a rise from around 40% to a robust 70% within the same timeframe.


Delving into the intricacies, the 1980s bore witness to a substantial chasm in the number of years children spent in educational institutions. Industrialised countries boasted more than quadruple the years of schooling compared to developing countries. The subsequent decade only saw this divide widen, underscoring the persistent educational advantage in the industrialised world.


In the realm of scientific and technical manpower, the disparity was equally compelling. The 1980 figure for the developing world was modest, with an increase that could be described as incremental at best by 1990. In stark contrast, industrialised countries not only started off with more than double the proportion of scientists and technicians but also expanded this workforce significantly over the 10-year span.


Financial commitment to research and development echoed this trend of disparity. The initial spending in developing countries, at around $50 billion, was markedly overshadowed by the $150 billion invested by industrialised nations. By 1990, the chasm had deepened profoundly, with the developing countries' expenditure witnessing a decline, juxtaposed against a surge to approximately $350 billion by their industrialised counterparts.


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Model Answer 3

The provided visual data meticulously delineates the disparity in participation in education and science between developing and industrialised nations during the years 1980 and 1990.


The overarching trend reveals a stark contrast in both education duration and scientific engagement, with industrialised countries significantly outpacing their developing counterparts. In 1980, the average years of schooling in developing nations hovered around a mere 2 years, in sharp contrast to the substantial 8 years observed in industrialised countries. The subsequent decade witnessed a notable rise in educational participation, with developing countries edging past the 3-year mark, while industrialised nations surpassed a full decade of average schooling.


An examination of the scientific workforce discloses a parallel narrative. The presence of scientists and technicians per 1,000 individuals in developing countries remained consistently below the 20-person threshold for both years observed. Contrastingly, industrialised countries showcased a robust figure averaging around 50 professionals per 1,000 individuals, underscoring a pronounced divide in scientific manpower.


Financial investment in research and development further underscores this divide. In 1980, developing nations allocated approximately 50 billion US dollars to this sector, dwarfed by the 150 billion committed by industrialised countries. A decade later, the chasm widened, with industrialised countries doubling their expenditure, whereas developing nations saw their investment halve, painting a concerning picture of the global allocation of resources towards scientific advancement.


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Model Answer 4

The charts provided offer an analytical comparison of the trends in participation in education and science in developing and industrialised countries over the years 1980 and 1990.


Central to the observation is the pronounced discrepancy in educational attainment and scientific engagement between the developing and industrialised nations. A notable feature is the progressive yet modest increase in the educational span in developing regions, juxtaposed with the significant strides made by industrialised nations. Concurrently, the representation of scientists and technicians per thousand people underscores a discernible imbalance, with industrialised nations demonstrating a marked ascension compared to the relatively static figures of the developing countries.


The educational landscape in 1980 was marked by an average of 2 years of schooling in developing nations, a figure which experienced a slight elevation to just above 3 years a decade later. Contrastingly, industrialised countries began the era with over 8 years of education on average, which escalated to beyond 10 years by 1990, reflecting a commitment to educational enhancement.


Regarding the scientific workforce, the data for developing countries in 1980 indicates less than a fifth of the ratio present in industrialised nations. This gap broadened substantially by 1990, with the latter almost doubling its cadre of scientists and technicians, signifying a robust expansion in the sector.


Investment in research and development mirrored these trends, with the spending in developing countries being comparatively conservative at about $50 billion in 1980, significantly dwarfed by the $150 billion allocated by industrialised nations. The subsequent decade saw these figures diverge further, with a reduction in the developing world's expenditure contrasting starkly against the industrialised nations' amplified investment, which peaked at approximately $350 billion.


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