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Changes in Spending Habits of People in UK between 1971 to 2001 - Task 1 Pie Charts

Updated: Jun 28

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.


The graphs show changes in spending habits of people in UK between 1971 and 2001.


Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


You should write at least 150 words.

Task 1 Pie Chart Band 9 Sample (The graphs show changes in spending habits of people in UK between 1971 and 2001.)

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Model Answer 1

The provided pie charts offer a comparative analysis of the changes in spending habits of people in the UK over a span of three decades, specifically between the years 1971 and 2001.


The overarching trend depicted indicates a significant shift in financial priorities, with a notable increase in the proportion of expenditure on vehicles. Initially, food consumption constituted the bulk of spending; by 2001, however, the automotive sector had overtaken it. This overall redirection of spending from basic necessities to more lifestyle-oriented purchases marks the most pronounced change.


Detailed examination of the 1971 data reveals that food accounted for almost half of all expenditures, at 44%, a figure which by 2001 had diminished to just 14%. The automobile industry, which stood at 22%, surged to become the dominant spending sector at 43%. Interestingly, expenditure on petrol maintained a steady proportion, only decreasing marginally from 10% to 8%. The period also witnessed a remarkable rise in spending on computers, escalating from a negligible 2% to a more substantial 12%, reflecting the technological advancements and increased accessibility of the digital age.


Conversely, expenditure on books saw a decline, dropping from 6% to a mere 1%, suggesting a possible shift in reading habits or the advent of alternative entertainment and information sources. The data also points to a consistent allocation towards dining out, with restaurants holding steady at 14% in 2001, up from 7% in 1971, indicating a possible change in social habits or disposable income usage.


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Model Answer 2

The pie charts delineate the evolution in the spending habits of the UK populace from 1971 to 2001, showcasing a clear shift in financial allocation among different sectors.


An overview of the data highlights two salient trends: a dramatic decrease in the percentage of income spent on food, and an upsurge in the financial share dedicated to cars, which heralds the changes in spending habits of people in the UK. While spending on books diminished, that on computers experienced a noteworthy ascent, reflective of technological progress during the 30-year interval.


In 1971, the expenditure on food was paramount, constituting 44% of an individual's budget. By 2001, this figure had contracted to 14%, indicating a substantial change in spending habits in the UK, possibly due to a diversification in the availability of goods and a change in lifestyle. Concurrently, the allocation for cars doubled, soaring to 43%, underscoring a shift towards greater mobility or preference for personal transportation. Moreover, despite the oil crises of the 1970s, the fraction of spending on petrol only slightly reduced from 10% to 8%, suggesting a stable demand for fuel in the face of rising automobile acquisition.


Further detailing the changes, the expenditure on computers, which was almost negligible in 1971 at 2%, swelled to 12% by 2001, mirroring the digital revolution and its integration into everyday life. In stark contrast, spending on books plummeted from 6% to a scant 1%, hinting at a transformation in reading habits and information consumption. It is also notable that the outlay on restaurant dining doubled, indicative of changing social patterns and discretionary spending.


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Model Answer 3

The pair of pie charts provides a comparative insight into the changes in spending habits of people in the UK, illustrating a thirty-year shift from 1971 to 2001.


Commencing with an overarching perspective, the data reveals a striking decline in the proportion of spending on food, coupled with a pronounced elevation in the financial share dedicated to cars. These two trends are emblematic of the broader changes in spending habits of people in the UK, indicative of evolving consumer preferences and economic conditions over the three decades.


Delving into specifics, the 1971 chart shows that nearly half of the typical UK consumer's budget (44%) was consumed by food expenses. Fast forward to 2001, and this figure had dramatically reduced to just 14%, suggesting a significant alteration in the spending habits of people in the UK, potentially due to improved food production efficiency or shifts in market prices. Meanwhile, spending on cars revved up from 22% to a dominant 43%, possibly reflecting the increasing importance of personal transportation in the UK lifestyle. Interestingly, the expense on petrol only witnessed a slight reduction, from 10% to 8%, despite the substantial increase in car spending.


Turning to technological and educational expenditures, the investment in computers surged from a marginal 2% to 12%, echoing the burgeoning significance of technology in everyday UK life. Conversely, the allocation for books saw a downturn, dwindling from 6% to a minimal 1%, perhaps a signal of changing leisure activities or educational resources.



Model Answer 4

The pie charts provide a visual comparison of the changes in spending habits of people in the UK across the decades, specifically between 1971 and 2001.


An initial observation of the charts immediately underscores a stark transformation in consumer expenditure: there was a considerable contraction in the budgetary share for food, while spending on cars notably accelerated. These patterns underscore the significant changes in spending habits of people in the UK, reflecting a consumer shift towards lifestyle and mobility.


In 1971, food represented the largest slice of the spending pie at 44%, indicative of its primary importance within household budgets. This percentage had significantly reduced by 2001, plummeting to just 14%, which exemplifies the changes in spending habits of people in the UK, perhaps due to a decrease in relative food costs or altered dietary preferences. Conversely, expenditure on cars witnessed a dramatic escalation, climbing from 22% to 43%, likely mirroring the growing importance of private transportation in daily life in the UK. Meanwhile, outlays on petrol subtly decreased by 2 percentage points, maintaining a relatively stable presence in the expenditure portfolio.


Furthermore, the allocation for technology, represented by computer-related expenses, jumped from a mere 2% to a noteworthy 12%, reflecting the digital revolution's impact on the UK society. On the contrary, the portion of spending on books significantly retracted, descending from 6% to 1%, possibly indicating a shift towards digital media.


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